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After EU antitrust ruling, Android's future in Europe looks like its present in China, with fragmented alternatives and numerous hubs for apps and services (Shannon Liao/The Verge) October 20, 2018

Shannon Liao / The Verge: After EU antitrust ruling, Android’s future in Europe looks like its present in China, with fragmented alternatives and numerous hubs for apps and services  —  By the end of the month, Google will charge a licensing fee in Europe for the Play Store and apps like YouTube and Gmail in […]

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Corning wants to put its Gorilla Glass on your next smartwatch – CNET

The glassmaker revealed Gorilla Glass SR+, a new super scratch-resistant material made specially for smartwatches.
Source: CNet

Malware exposes payment card data at Kimpton Hotels – CNET

Servers used to process payments at the boutique hotel chain’s properties are infected with malware designed to steal customer card numbers, names and expiration dates.
Source: CNet

IFA 2016: All of the gadgets from Europe's biggest tech show – CNET

Join CNET editors on a tour of all the gadgets catching our eye at the IFA 2016 tech show in Berlin.
Source: CNet

The oracle speaks — Kanye West tweets McDonald's is his favorite brand – CNET

Technically Incorrect: This is how you get 110,000 people to instantly like a tweet. You stand up for something.
Source: CNet

Real men wear Samsung watches (says new Samsung ad) – CNET

Technically Incorrect: The launch ad for the Gear S3 smartwatch feels very much like an old-fashioned watch ad. A men’s watch ad. Is this the way to differentiate yourself from Apple watch?
Source: CNet

Dropbox hack leaks 68 million usernames and passwords – CNET

A hack from 2012 reportedly resulted in the breach of far more user information than previously believed.
Source: CNet

More mystery and monsters in 'Stranger Things' season 2? – CNET

Netflix has renewed the ’80s-inspired horror series. Read our theories on Eleven’s fate, those creepy pollywogs and Chief Hopper’s new gig.
Source: CNet

Hands-on review: Getac S410

Hands-on review: Getac S410

If there was a fashion competition for laptops, the Getac S410 wouldn’t win it. And that’s fine, because this chunky system is a semi-rugged model designed to be used by field operatives based out in the great outdoors who need a device that’s reliable, solid and won’t weigh them down. Too much, anyway.

Getac S410

People who might use one include the police, professional services, vehicle operators and professionals who work in public safety and manufacturing. Where rugged tablets like the Panasonic CF-20 make more sense when portability is paramount and the device has to be held with one hand, the S410 offers a more traditional laptop experience with a full-sized keyboard and 14-inch display.

Getac S410

In terms of design, the S410 resembles a laptop you might have bought in 2002. To call it chunky would be something of an understatement, its thickness wading in at a substantial 1.4 inches (around 35mm). Still, that’s an improvement on the previous model, the Getac S400, which measured 1.93 inches (around 48mm) thick – so Getac is moving things in the right direction with this brand-new design.

Getac S410

All of that chunk lends the S410 a reassuringly solid feel in the hand. It’s near impossible to detect any flex in the device’s body, except for the keyboard part – and even then you have to press down really hard to get the plastic to bend. The solid chassis is what sets the S410 apart from regular laptops and quite literally forms the bulk of the laptop’s basic cost. It starts at £1,149 (around US$1,518 or AUS$1,990) and rises north of that sharply as the specs increase.

Getac S410

Compared to other rugged devices like the aforementioned Panasonic ToughBook CF-20. the Getac’s display is a let down. It’s 14-inches in size, but the pixel-resolution is a meager 1,366 x 768. Forgetting sharpness for a second, this provides a distinct lack of screen real-estate and pinning two apps side-by-side is a compromised experience. There’s no issue with using one app at a time in full-screen, but multi-tasking is frustrating at best.

Getac S410

The display is also difficult to see outdoors due to lackluster brightness. The S410 can be configured with Getac’s 1000-nits Lumibond display with sunlight readable technology, but we can only assume that it was missing on our review sample as it barely looked like it was reaching 400 nits to our eyes. Colours appear washed out and lifeless, and viewing angles are poor due to the TFT panel used.

The S410’s keyboard posses no challenges to typing, with decent sized keys – even if they’re not particularly satisfying to type on and sound cheap under the fingers. Getac has done a better job with the trackpad and its accompanying buttons, which despite being small are responsive. Unfortunately there’s no touch operation here, so forget using a digitizer or your fingers.

Getac S410

You can, of course, hook up a mouse to the machine into one of the ports. Connectivity options include four USB ports, Wi-Fi (802.11c), audio, VGA, HDMI and an SD-Slot.

Getac has outfitted the S410 with Intel’s ultra-low voltage Core i5-6200U processor clocked at 2.3GHz (Turbo Boost to 2.4GHz), backed up by an insubstantial 4GB of main memory. There was no dedicated graphics option to speak of in our review sample, with the processor’s integrated HD Graphics 520 taking on graphics duties alone.

Getac S410

Benchmarks

  • Cinebench R15: OpenGL: 28.38 fps; CPU: 284 points
  • Geekbench (Single-Core): 2,691 points; (Multi-Core) 5,732 points
  • Battery test (1080p looped video streamed over Wi-Fi in Edge, 50% brightness): 5 hours 24 minutes

The S410 produced fairly low benchmark results, and while the system was nippy enough most of the time with apps loading instantly, it did produce occasional moments of lag when performing tasks such as opening the Settings or Action Center panel. You won’t have any problem running legacy apps on this machine, but the S410 would struggle under more CPU-intensive scenarios.

Getac S410

Even battery life isn’t particularly up to scratch, despite the low-resolution display, with the S410 reaching a barely acceptable 5 hours and 24 minutes away from the plug socket. That’s fine for, say, an Asus UX305 ultrabook, but the Getac is designed to be used away from a plug socket for hours on end.

Also, the test was conducted with the screen’s brightness set to 50%, which rendered it nearly impossible to see outdoors in bright sunlight. Even though you would eke out a few more hours of battery, it would be at the expense of actually being able to do any work on the display.

Early verdict

It feels like the entry-level version of the Getac S410 has potential, but the unit we received to test was way too compromised to recommend. Its design, although chunky, is a clear improvement on the S400 and houses a comfortable keyboard, practical carry handle and a healthy selection of ports. However, the machine’s display, average-strength processor and low amount of main memory render it unsuitable for working out in the field. When that’s the primary objective of the device, that’s not particularly heartening.

Source: Tech Radar

iPhone packaging pics boost headphone rumors – CNET

Purported photos of the packaging for Apple’s newest iPhone appear to show headphones will plug into the device’s charging port.
Source: CNet

Holmes and Watson look extra pensive in 'Sherlock' season 4 image – CNET

Actors Benedict Cumberbatch and Martin Freeman appear to be in a brooding mood in the latest image released for the upcoming season.
Source: CNet

Samsung delays Galaxy Note 7 shipments for quality control – CNET

The recently released phone needs more testing, the company said. Could it be due to exploding batteries?
Source: CNet

Tarantula being eaten alive fights its way out of a toad's mouth – CNET

If you need a lesson in why you should never give up, take it from this western desert tarantula escaping from the mouth of a hungry toad.
Source: CNet

Hands-on review: IFA 2016: Lenovo Yoga 910

Hands-on review: IFA 2016: Lenovo Yoga 910

After sticking with the same design for two years, Lenovo is giving the Yoga 900 a dramatic makeover and it’s fair to say the Yoga 910 is completely different 2-in-1 laptop. Lenovo has tweaked or completely changed every element of its flagship convertible with everything including a slimmer chassis, larger 13.9-inch UHD screen, smaller bezels, revamped keyboard layout and the Intel 7th generation processors.

However, all these little improvements have made the Lenovo Yoga 910 a slightly more expensive device starting at $1,299. But even with the higher price tag, this still feels like the best hybrid machine on the market.

Lenovo Yoga 910 review

Design

Lenovo claims the Yoga 910 the world’s thinnest Intel Core i7 powered convertible measuring in at just 14.3mm thick (0.56 inches) – 0.6mm (0.02 inches) thinner than the Yoga 900. Along with dropping some extra bulk, this new hybrid has a new sleeker and sharper styling rather than the slightly curvy frame of yesteryear.

The Lenovo Yoga 910 follows a starkly modern design with straight lines forming sharp angles including places you wouldn’t expect such embellishment. For example, the top and bottom half of the notebook meet to a slightly indented V-shape and an even more prominent gap near the watchband hinge.

Lenovo Yoga 910 review

The modern touches are a welcome change after seeing practically the same design for the last two years, but at the same time it feels like Lenovo went too far in certain respects. The leatherette interior was one of the most comfortable aspects of the Yoga 900 and now it has been replaced with cold aluminum sheet.

Thanks to the slimmer design, you also lose Lenovo’s full-sized USB-A charging port in exchange for the new USB-C standard. That said, there are plenty of new elements to enjoy here including the a newly added fingerprint reader and one of the most impressive screens ever seen on a 13-inch.

Lenovo Yoga 910 review

Larger screen with none of the bulk

The Dell XPS 13 and XPS 15 blew us away by packing full-size screen into smaller chassis, and now Lenovo is trying to capture the same magic with the Yoga 910.

The display panel size has been bumped up to 13.9-inches and a new 4K resolution without drastically increasing the size of the chassis. In fact, this laptop features some of the thinnest bezels we’ve ever seen on a Lenovo device.

This is thanks to slimming down the bezels along the top and sides while moving the webcam to the sizable chin beneath the screen. It effectively uses the same Infinity Screen layout first introduced by Dell and the only real discernable differences is Lenovo has placed the webcam in the center of the screen rather than off to the left.

Lenovo Yoga 910 review

That said, the Yoga 910 uses its clever convertible abilities to avoid displaying a worm’s-eye view during video calls. Users can simply switch the laptop into tent mode and have it sit on its front edges to have a video camera that meets them at eye-level.

One downside to this new design is the bottom bezel is nearly two inches tall and largely featureless. Thanks to the webcam’s positioning, Lenovo had to leave out a Windows button soft key, which would have added some much needed some flair to hybrid’s extra-large chin.

Lenovo Yoga 910 review

Everything is new

Lenovo introduced plenty of other little tweaks here and there to make the Yoga 910 an even better laptop-tablet.

The keyboard, for example, no longer has any of those annoying right-handed shortcut keys to get in the way of you hitting the enter key. Meanwhile, the trackpad is appreciably larger and there’s even a newly added fingerprint reader to help get you signed through Windows Hello with a simple finger press.

The Lenovo Yoga 910 features some bumped up specs including Intel’s freshly announced Intel 7th generation processors with up to 1TB of PCIe SSD storage and 16GB of memory. Battery life has also seen a significant bump to 10.5 hours on UHD model and 15.5 hours with Full HD variants – but those are only estimates we plan to take to task.

Lenovo Yoga 910 review

Early verdict

The Lenovo Yoga 900 perfected the 2-in-1 laptop formula and now the Yoga 910 seeks to elevate the series to all new heights. There are plenty of welcome elements here including the larger screen, edgier design and revamped inputs. However, some of the changes aren’t sitting well with us including the marginally higher price and the new bare metal keyboard deck.

In the past the Yoga 900 series has blended a good mix of affordability with performance, but this latest iteration may skew things too far into the luxury category. We’ll have to see how the other configurations stack up as well as how this machine performs before we can deliver our final verdict, but we’re optimistic that Lenovo has knocked it out of the park once again.

Source: Tech Radar

Hands-on review: IFA 2016: Lenovo Yoga Book

Hands-on review: IFA 2016: Lenovo Yoga Book

If Apple, Microsoft and their lot are the Thomas Edisons of the computing industry, then Lenovo has become the Nikola Tesla. Whereas the de facto founders of Silicon Valley established (and consistently update) the status quo for computing, Lenovo has constantly questioned and toyed with just what computing is since it bought IBM’s ThinkPad business.

Lenovo’s latest wild experiment? The company that pioneered the convertible hybrid laptop design has taken that concept to what might be its logical conclusion: the Yoga Book.

Why make such strong allusions? Because, like so many of Tesla’s works, the Yoga Book really could either be the cool, ingenious, tablet-driven future of laptops that just makes sense. Or, it could be a flop to be forever remembered by diehard fans and hipsters.

Yoga Book

Keyboard, begone!

This is because the Yoga Book, a 10.1-inch laptop-tablet hybrid that comes with either Android Marshmallow or Windows 10, has no keyboard. Rather, its "bottom" half, attached via a variation on Lenovo’s signature 360-degree watchband hinge, is a capacitive touch surface.

This magnesium-aluminum alloy surface (found across the tablet), called a Create Pad by Lenovo, can conjure a touch-based keyboard for you instantly. The Create Pad also features haptic feedback – and, living up to its name, can double as a veritable Wacom digitizer replacement with Lenovo’s Real Pen stylus.

Just sit on that for a moment. A computing device that can operate as a laptop, a full blown tablet and a digital art tool without so much as a button press between them. It sounds like one of those too-good-to-be-true scenarios, doesn’t it?

Yoga Book

Having played with the Yoga Book for a few minutes during a briefing recently, we can say that is not necessarily the case here. We’ll be upfront in saying that typing on a Yoga Book involves a rather steep learning curve.

We’re all used to typing on screens because they’re in the front of our faces – we can always see in plain sight where our fingers are. That’s not the case with a laptop. In fact, some might say the mark of a skilled typist is that she doesn’t have to look at the keyboard at all.

Upon first trying to type on the Yoga Book, your eyes will probably struggle to stop from involuntarily looking at the keyboard. The haptic feedback helps fill in for the physical touch and force of plastic keys, but we’re hesitant to say whether it’s a worthy replacement.

Yoga Book

At the very least, it is incredibly close.

Typing on the device admittedly feels a bit strange and discouraging for someone that prides himself on his typing accuracy. But, coupled with practice and some awfully strong auto-correction software, you might not be missing your laptop before long. (I certainly wasn’t.)

However, with this comes a conundrum facing the Yoga Book: at least from when we last tried out the device, it’s clear that either Lenovo or Microsoft has to work on the Yoga Book with Windows 10’s auto-correction software. Frankly, it’s far less advanced than Google’s.

Yoga Book

We had noticeably more trouble typing out sentences on the Windows 10 model than the Android one during our time with both, which is a shame considering Microsoft’s superior position in pen recognition and general productivity. Hopefully, these discrepancies will be fully resolved before the devices’ launch this October.

Death (or rebirth) to the pen

The typing experience only covers one half of the Yoga Book’s incredibly unique selling proposition. The device can double as a drawing tool with the included Real Pen. The palm rejection is on point, as is the pressure sensitivity – all 2,048 levels of it.

But, what if you like good old pen and paper? Lenovo’s thought of that, too. Using the firm’s Book Pad, really just a yellow note pad with a magnetic strip to hold on with, you can instantly back up your handwritten, analog notes into digital representations.

Yoga Book

This is accomplished through what is known as electromagnetic response (EMR) technology. Basically, the pen – which can swap between real ink and plastic tips – generates electromagnetic electricity that the tablet’s Create Pad picks up and translates into legible characters, words and sentences.

The technology in action was a bit mind blowing to see for the first time, to be honest. Being able to interact with a single device in this many ways, and effectively, is nothing short of amazing.

The best of the rest

Lenovo powers this futuristic experience with a quad-core Intel Atom x-series processor, 4GB of DDR3 RAM and 64GB of flash storage – all behind an FHD (1,920 x 1,200) IPS display. And, that’s on both Windows 10 and Android.

Yoga Book

An 8,500 mAh battery said to last up to 15 hours of general usage keeps the 0.38-inch-thin (9.6mm), 1.52-pound (690g) slate running. (Of course, we couldn’t test this during a hands on review.)

The Windows 10 version of the Yoga Book comes solely in all Carbon Black, while the Android version offers Gunmetal Gray and Champagne Gold.

Early verdict

Honestly, this thing could come in purple and this editor would still buy in. (Actually, that would look pretty cool.) That’s partly because, for the tablet, a Real Pen, ink cartridge refills and screen tips, and the Book Pad, Lenovo wants just $499 (about £391, AU$664) for the Android version and $549 (about £419, AU$731) for the Windows variety to start.

Yoga Book

Sure, this is a low-powered device no doubt, but nothing that you couldn’t complete basic productivity tasks with, like what some of us at TechRadar use a Surface Pro 4 every day for.

Ultimately, to focus on things like specs and power is to completely miss the point of the Yoga Book. The point is to show us a different way of computing that has been a long time coming, the first truly exciting and genuinely interesting attempt to push the laptop into the next phase of its storied life.

And, it actually works.

Source: Tech Radar

Dropbox changes passwords after 68M account records were compromised

Dropbox’s move last week to ask users who had signed up before mid-2012 to change their account passwords followed the discovery of a large dump of email addresses and passwords related to these accounts.

The online storage company confirmed late Tuesday reports that 68 million user email addresses and hashed and salted passwords from an incident in 2012 had been compromised.

Dropbox said that the password reset the company completed last week covered all of the affected users so that the Dropbox accounts are protected.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Source: Security

Microsoft's Windows 10 'Redstone 2' test build 14915 now available for PCs, phones

Microsoft has released Build 14915, its latest Windows 10 ‘Redstone 2’ test build to PC and phone testers.
Source: Microsoft

CBS All Access launches ad-free option for $9.99 – CNET

Teased earlier this year by the CEO of CBS, the higher-priced tier still includes ads on its live TV stream.
Source: CNet

Audi's A3 e-tron plug-in gets a fresh face after one year on the market – Roadshow

Also new for this year is a wealth of tech updates, including Virtual Cockpit, Android Auto and Apple CarPlay.
Source: CNet

'Doctor Strange' villain teased in new video – CNET

In a sneak peek from Marvel, fans get a glimpse of three characters: Karl Mordo, the Ancient One and Kaecilius, the movie’s villain.
Source: CNet

Samsung's Gear S3 will work with iPhones — eventually – CNET

Samsung is still working on getting the Gear S2 to work with Apple’s mobile software, but there isn’t a timeline yet.
Source: CNet

Behold a giant black sea slug as big as a chihuahua – CNET

Wildlife expert Coyote Peterson searches for the largest slug in the world, the giant Black Sea Hare, along the coast of California.
Source: CNet

Adobe patches critical vulnerability in ColdFusion application server

Adobe Systems released critical security patches for its ColdFusion application server, which has been a target for hackers in the past.

The updates are available for ColdFusion versions 10 and 11 and address a critical security vulnerability that could lead to sensitive information disclosure when parsing specially crafted XML entities.

Administrators are advised to upgrade their ColdFusion deployments to version 10 update 21 or version 11 update 10, depending on which branch they’re using. The ColdFusion 2016 release is not affected, Adobe said in a security advisory.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Source: Security

It's official: Netflix greenlights 'Stranger Things' season two – CNET

“Stranger Things” fans, prepare for goosebumps: Netflix has officially renewed the hit paranormal thriller with a YouTube video set to the show’s retro theme music.
Source: CNet

Acer Pawbo+ helps you play with your pets and even feed them from your phone – CNET

The new Pawbo+ video calls your pets and dispenses treats even when you’re out of the house.
Source: CNet

Hands-on review: IFA 2016: Acer Swift 7

Hands-on review: IFA 2016: Acer Swift 7

Acer’s shiny new Swift 7 laptop has one-upped Apple’s MacBook. The first Ultrabook to measure under 1cm thick (at the chunkier end, obviously), it’s deliciously sleek and a real tempting option if you’re looking for an ultraportable to take on the move.

In other words, it measures 9.98mm at the rear end, which features a black-and-gold design that contrasts brilliantly. It has a real touch of premium about it and reminds us of HP’s equally sleek HP Spectre.

Acer Swift 7

Thickness aside, the 14-inch 1080p display is the real standout here. It may only be Full HD, but it’s a brilliant IPS panel that, as such, gives off excellent horizontal and vertical viewing angles.

Acer Swift 7

The screen’s color saturation is impressive, with bold and vibrant colors complemented with deep and powerful blacks. It’s Corning’s Gorilla Glass, too, so it should stand up well to drops, knocks and scrapes.

The display’s bezel is a little chunkier than what we’ve been spoiled with by devices like Dell’s XPS 13 and the Spectre 13, but that’s a minor gripe.

Acer Swift 7

Weighing just 1.1kg, this is a pleasingly light device that you can easily pick up and wave about in one hand. Despite its lightweight nature and thin design, it packs in a solid, chiclet-spaced keyboard that’s paired with an incredibly roomy trackpad that makes executing Windows 10‘s gesture commands a breeze.

Acer Swift 7

Intel has slipped its 7th-generation Core i-series processors under the hood, and it claims that there’s enough internal juice for you to play Overwatch at Full HD with fluid frame rates without the need for a discrete graphics chip.

Acer Swift 7

Acer says that the Swift 7 will start at $999 or €1,299 (around £1,100) in Europe, when it’s due to arrive in October.

This is a flash hands on review to give you the chance to see what the phone is all about as soon as possible. Stay tuned as we’ll be expanding and upgrading this review very shortly with more info.

Source: Tech Radar

Hands-on review: Acer Swift 7

Hands-on review: Acer Swift 7

Acer’s shiny new Swift 7 laptop has one-upped Apple’s MacBook. The first Ultrabook to measure under 1cm thick (at the chunkier end, obviously), it’s deliciously sleek and a real tempting option if you’re looking for an ultraportable to take on the move.

In other words, it measures 9.98mm at the rear end, which features a black-and-gold design that contrasts brilliantly. It has a real touch of premium about it and reminds us of HP’s equally sleek HP Spectre.

Acer Swift 7

Thickness aside, the 14-inch 1080p display is the real standout here. It may only be Full HD, but it’s a brilliant IPS panel that, as such, gives off excellent horizontal and vertical viewing angles.

Acer Swift 7

The screen’s color saturation is impressive, with bold and vibrant colors complemented with deep and powerful blacks. It’s Corning’s Gorilla Glass, too, so it should stand up well to drops, knocks and scrapes.

The display’s bezel is a little chunkier than what we’ve been spoiled with by devices like Dell’s XPS 13 and the Spectre 13, but that’s a minor gripe.

Acer Swift 7

Weighing just 1.1kg, this is a pleasingly light device that you can easily pick up and wave about in one hand. Despite its lightweight nature and thin design, it packs in a solid, chiclet-spaced keyboard that’s paired with an incredibly roomy trackpad that makes executing Windows 10‘s gesture commands a breeze.

Acer Swift 7

Intel has slipped its 7th-generation Core i-series processors under the hood, and it claims that there’s enough internal juice for you to play Overwatch at Full HD with fluid frame rates without the need for a discrete graphics chip.

Acer Swift 7

Acer says that the Swift 7 will start at $999 or €1,299 (around £1,100) in Europe, when it’s due to arrive in October.

This is a flash hands on review to give you the chance to see what the phone is all about as soon as possible. Stay tuned as we’ll be expanding and upgrading this review very shortly with more info.

Source: Tech Radar

How to keep viral memes from spreading malware in your enterprise

Perhaps the worst news about Pokemon Go is how attackers are using it to spread malware. This is not the first time bad-guy hackers have leveraged the popularity of games to spread malicious software. Viral memes spread malware, too, via drive-by attacks as people visit malicious sites that draw them by hosting or linking to the internet-based cultural sensation.

Users assume that games and meme sites have integrity. This makes it easy for the hackers to push compromising software onto consumers’ phones and computers and into your organization. Cyber thugs also use man-in-the-middle attacks on game apps to take control of mobile devices and launch attacks on the enterprise.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Source: Security

Hands-on review: IFA 2016: Acer Predator 21 X

Hands-on review: IFA 2016: Acer Predator 21 X

We’d scoff if you told us about one of the Acer Predator 21 X’s crazy features. A curved display? On a laptop? Twin GTX 1080 graphics cards?

And, a tiny window through which you can peer in to see the processor’s cooling fan spinning around? Yeah, pull the other one.

Rear

As it happens, the Predator 21 X is very real, and it’s a marvel to look at. It requires two power supplies to provide juice to its dual GTX 1080 GPUs inside.

Dual 1080

The crazy doesn’t stop there: it has a mechanical keyboard that uses Cherry MX switches, with RGB backlighting under each key. An Acer spokesperson on the booth didn’t know which variation of Cherry’s switch was in our demo sample, but they felt like Browns.

Curved

Above the keyboard is a triangular window used to show off the fans inside, giving laptop lovers the sort of visual satisfaction that desktop PC gamers have enjoyed for years. There’s also Intel’s new 7th-generation Kaby Lake processors on the inside, in addition to up to 4TB of SSD storage.

Window

On the left-hand side of the keyboard are macro keys that can be used to fire off specialized commands in-game. Slip around the side, and you’ll find a pair of full-sized USB ports alongside a microphone and headphone jack.

Macro keys

Another interesting point about the Predator 21 X – and there are many – is its removable side panel that instantly converts from a numberpad to a trackpad. It’s an ingenious idea and one that we can see being done on smaller non-gaming laptops, too.

Mouse pad

At 8kg in weight, the Predator 12 X is hardly portable – quite the opposite. But, if you’re looking for a desktop replacement machine with insane amounts of power, its 2,560 x 1,080-resolution curved display is a viable replacement for a regular monitor.

It even has Tobii eye-tracking built in, which allows you to peer around levels and change camera angles by focusing on certain parts of the screen with your eyes.

Lid

It’s huge, loud and about as brash as can be, but it’s hard to deny that the Predator 21 X is a little bit genius, too. Acer has yet to announce pricing, but there’s a good chance you’ll have to remortgage your house to buy one.

This is a flash hands on review to give you the chance to see what the phone is all about as soon as possible. Stay tuned as we’ll be expanding and upgrading this review very shortly with more info.

Source: Tech Radar

BitTorrent client is found distributing Mac-based malware

A popular BitTorrent client called Transmission has again been found distributing Mac-based malware, months after it was used to spread a strand of ransomware.

Researchers at security firm ESET have been following a malware called OSX/Keydnap, which can steal passwords, and noticed that it was spreading through Transmission’s official site.

Somehow, a version of the BitTorrent client containing the malware had been recently made available on the site, ESET said in a blog post on Tuesday.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Source: Security

Review: Download review: System Ninja review

Review: Download review: System Ninja review

System Ninja provides a quick and easy way to optimize your PC. If you’re running low on disk space, it helps you to recover valuable megabytes (or even gigabytes) while improving your privacy and security in to the bargain.

Download System Ninja freeOn top of this, you’ll find an uninstaller for quickly removing programs you no longer need, a startup manager to cut boot time, and a process manager for keeping an eye on what’s running in the background. There is also the PC Analysis section, which tells you everything you could ever need to know about your hardware.

System Ninja Junk Scanner

User experience

System Ninja has a simple tabbed interface that suggests (but doesn’t enforce) a particular workflow: start at the left with the Junk Scanner and work across to the right.

System Ninja’s Junk Scanner serves a dual purpose. It removes unnecessary programs and files, but the increasing size of hard drives means this kind of clutter has less of an impact on system performance than it once did. Leftover files and cookies are, however, a potential privacy and security risk, so it’s good practice to clean up after messy programs.

The System Tools tab contains the Startup Manager, App Uninstaller and Process Manager. In many ways these all mimic features and options already available in the various version of Windows, but it’s handy to have them all accessible in the same place.

The PC Analysis section is very neatly laid out, and is a goldmine of information for anyone curious about their hardware, If you want to find out the model of your motherboard to check how much RAM it supports, check the exact model of your graphics card to make sure you download the right drivers, this is where to look.

System Ninja analysis

We liked

Plugins! System Ninja is a wonderfully useful little utility in its own right, but you can easily add a host of new features thanks to support for plugins. By downloading little add-ons, you can bring a registry cleaner, services manager, file renamer, duplicate file finder, and a file analyzer to the program.

If you don’t want a certain tool, you don’t need to install it, and it’s this customisation extendability that makes System Ninja so appealing. The process of installing the plugins could have been made a little more intuitive – it’s going to be off-putting to beginners – but it’s still a great option to have.

System Ninja process manager

We disliked

While useful, System Ninja’s Startup Manager has the potential to be a little dangerous for one simple reason – there is just not enough information given about startup items for many people to be able to correctly identify what they are and to determine whether they’re essential. A little common sense can go a long way, but some extra guidance would have been appreciated as it would be all too easy to end up with a computer that doesn’t function properly. Users are left having to search the internet for information about what particular startup items might be, when a description could have been provided easily.

Final verdict

Download System Ninja freeEven if you feel that System Ninja doesn’t have a great deal to offer that can’t already be found in Windows, the fact that it is free and provides a handy single interface to access a wealth of tools and information works in its favor.

Specifications

Developer: SingularLabs

License: Freeware

System requirements:

  • Operating system: Windows Vista, 7, 8, 10
  • Processor: Not specified
  • RAM: Not specified
  • Disk space: Not specified

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Source: Tech Radar

Review: SentinelOne blocks and dissects threats

SentinelOne Endpoint Protection Platform (EPP) is an antimalware solution that protects against targeted attacks, malware, and zero-day threats through behavioral analysis and process whitelisting and blacklisting. The client agent, which analyzes the behavior of processes on Windows, OS X, Linux, and Android endpoints, can replace or run alongside other signature-based antimalware solutions. SentinelOne EPP stands out not only for its protection capabilities but also for its excellent forensics and threat analysis.

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(Insider Story)
Source: Security

Hands-on review: IFA 2016: Acer Spin 7

Hands-on review: IFA 2016: Acer Spin 7

You’re spoilt for choice these days if you want a convertible laptop, but Acer is hoping you’ll only have eyes for its attractive new Spin 7 convertible.

Launched alongside Acer’s new Swift 7 laptop, this high-end offering immediately catches the eye. That’s thanks to a vibrant, glossy IPS display that serves up rich colors and superb horizontal and vertical viewing angles.

Spin 7

If you’re looking to stream 1080p video or partake in some light gaming, the Spin 7’s screen is one of the finest Full HD offerings we’ve seen in some time.

Ports

At 10.98mm thick, this is one of the thinnest convertibles around. Grabbing the Spin 7’s chamfered edges to flip the device into its various positions is far from a chore, and we can see it posing no weight problems when slung into a backpack for transportation.

Thin

Things are promising on the inside, too, thanks to Intel’s latest 7th-generation Kaby Lake processor, which its maker claims can help the machine run up to eight hours before giving up the ghost. That’s backed up by 8GB of RAM and a 256GB SSD.

The Spin 7 is a little thin on the ground where connectivity is concerned, with two USB-C ports running the show – so it might just be time to embrace that USB Type-A converter.

Kaby

Its chiclet-spaced keyboard provides a decent level of travel and should prove up to the task of bashing out longer documents, and you could easily connect a Bluetooth keyboard to use the device in tent mode.

Acer’s Spin 7 will start at $1,199 or €1,299 (around £1,100) when it lands in October.

This is a flash hands on review to give you the chance to see what the phone is all about as soon as possible. Stay tuned as we’ll be expanding and upgrading this review very shortly with more info.

Source: Tech Radar

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Review: Dell Inspiron 13 7000 2-in-1

Review: Dell Inspiron 13 7000 2-in-1

Introduction and design

In our experience, 2-in-1 laptops tend to spend most of the time in one configuration or the other. The convertible aspect is diminished when the computer is primarily used as a laptop. The updated Dell 2-in-1 Inspiron, however, does such a fine job as both laptop and tablet, we found myself switching between modes all the time.

Still, we used the Inspiron 13-7000 series more often as a laptop, but its size and weight make the tablet mode a joy with leisurely applications. In some ways, it’s like a mullet: business up front, party in the rear, but without all the negative connotations of the world’s worst haircut.

Dell Inspiron 13 7000 2-in-1 review

Design

Like its competitors, the Lenovo Yoga 900 and the Asus ZenBook Flip UX360, the Inspiron is clad in an eye-catching metal shell. In fact, other than the differing logos, all 3 look remarkably similar. The biggest difference is the Lenovo’s hinge is a fancy solution that borrows from the design of metallic watch bands. Both the ZenBook and Inspiron have standard hinges connecting the screen and body, whereas the Lenovo uses a single, device-spanning solution.

Nonetheless Dell’s 2-in-1 is contained in a very attractive aluminum casing. The bevel around the trackpad is milled to an angle that brings out the natural shine of the metal on an otherwise brushed-aluminum body. The outer rim of the laptop lid has the same chamfered edge around it, giving it just enough flash to make it pop.

The chiclet keyboard has a bluish-white backlight reminiscent of the LED headlights of modern cars. The travel on the keys is just a touch on the shallow side, but it still feels comfortable and satisfying to use for writing papers or long emails. The trackpad, too, is satisfyingly tactile, with just the right amount of "click."

Dell Inspiron 13 7000 2-in-1 review

Losing touch

Input-wise, the only place we really found the Inspiron lacking was in its touch interface – although that might have more to do with Windows 10 than quality of the screen.

Some of our hands are fairly big, and sometimes we would tap a backlink or open a program from the desktop and either miss entirely, or hit something nearby. Everyone knows close only counts in hand grenades and horseshoes.

Another annoying issue that broadly affects Windows 10’s touch keyboard is the lack of autocorrect. In other words, if you’re used to typing on a smartphone, you’re probably going to make a lot of typos using the Windows touch keypad.

Dell Inspiron 13 7000 2-in-1 review

By default, it doesn’t auto-correct, or auto-complete, which is a problem for someone like me whose finesse is more akin to a bull in a china shop. Typically, if you’re typing away on a keyboard you can catch typos for the most part, but it’s too easy slide over multiple touchscreen keys and enter errant characters.

Gone from the updated Inspiron 2-in-1 is the built-in stylus, which would help with accuracy on the touch screen. Older models hid the stylus away in such as fashion as to make it look like a physical button. It would have been nice to at least have the option, but third-party solutions exist if you really need a digital pen in your life.

For getting work done, laptop mode is the clear winner. Typing on the Windows 10 on-screen keyboard is OK for entering URLs into search bars, but otherwise, not great. For fun stuff, like reading comics on Comixology, surfing the web, or watching movies, tablet mode is great. In fact, we’re seriously considering changing the orientation of our desktop monitors because reading on a vertical screen is kind of the best thing.

Specifications and value

The Inspiron we tested weighs in at 1.75 kg, or 3.5 lbs. It’s downright husky up against both the svelte Lenovo Yoga 900 at 2.84 lbs./1.28 kg, and the 2.9 lbs./1.31 kg Asus Zenbook UX360.

The weight of the Inspiron 7000 series only goes up from there, with the heaviest models weighing in an astonishing 6.12 lbs./2.77 kg for the 17-inch entry model. At that point, a 2-in-1 just seems completely impractical, with comfort suffering measurably while in the tablet configuration.

The extra half-pound of weight is easily forgivable when you consider the price. The Inspiron 13-7000 starts at $799 or $1,698 (about £610), as opposed to the $1,199 (£999, AU$2,199) Yoga.

The Zenbook also retails for $799 (about £610, AU$1,060), but you downgrade from a base-model Intel Core i3-6100u to an Intel M3-6Y30 mobile processor. ASUS makes up for the processor with twice the storage and twice the RAM of the base Inspiron, which comes with a 256GB solid-state drive and 4GB DDR4 RAM.

Dell Inspiron 13 7000 2-in-1 review

Spec Sheet

Here is the Dell Inspiron 13 7000 2-in-1 configuration sent to TechRadar for review:

  • CPU: 1.8GHz Intel Core i5-6260U Processor (dual-core, 3MB cache, up to 2.9GHz with TurboBoost)
  • Graphics: Intel Iris Graphics 540
  • RAM: 4 GB single-channel DDR4 2133 MHz
  • Screen: 13.3-inch, FHD (1920×1080) Truelife LED-Backlit Touch Display
  • Storage: 256 GB SSD
  • Ports: HDMI 1.4a, USB Type-C (ThunderBolt 3.0), USB 3.0 with PowerShare, USB 2.0, SD card reader
  • Connectivity: 802.11ac dual band Wi-Fi; Bluetooth 4.0
  • Camera: 720p Infrared Webcam with Dual Digital Microphone Array
  • Weight: 3.52 lbs (1.75 kg)
  • Size: 12.69 x 8.82 x 0.76 inches (32.3 x 22.4.0 x 1.92mm: W x D x H)

Dell Inspiron 13 7000 2-in-1 review

Performance

Running multiple applications in the background while we watched a movie on HBO Go didn’t slow anything down. So while this 13-inch convertible isn’t a powerhouse, it gets the job done. That said, it definitely doesn’t hit the highs of a gaming laptop, but you wouldn’t have too much trouble playing indies or older games on it, if that’s your thing.

Really, a 2-in-1 computer is perfect to split between productivity and casual use, while the computing power on-hand strikes a good balance between affordability and utility. I never noticed any performance issues in my everyday use, although we know better than to try and play something like GTA 5 or edit multiple movie files in Adobe Premiere Pro.

Dell Inspiron 13 7000 2-in-1 review

Benchmarks

Here’s how the Dell Inspiron 13 7000 2-in-1 performed in our suite of benchmark tests:

  • 3DMark: Cloud Gate:5618; Sky Diver:3684; Fire Strike: 851
  • Cinebench CPU: 282 points; Graphics: 43.7 fps
  • GeekBench: 3119 (single-core); 6411 (multi-core)
  • PCMark 8 (Home Test): 2,794 points
  • PCMark 8 Battery Life: 3 hours and 15 minutes

The Inspiron ekes out a win on every test except battery, where it pales in comparison to the Yoga’s 5 hours and 6 minutes on the PCMark 8 Battery Life test. It also does quite a bit better than the ASUS ZenBook in every test…with the exception of battery.

Dell claims the configuration we tested gets 8 hours, 24 minutes of life from its integrated, 3-cell battery, but I came up short in my own experience.

That’s not to say battery life is a problem. Far from it: With Guardians of the Galaxy playing in full-screen, in HD and on repeat, we got 5 hours 25 minutes of life from the Inspiron. This was about the same usage we got over the course of a day, with Chrome and Firefox open, running some heavy work-related Ajax webpages in the background. We bounced back and forth between work and watching movies on HBO Go, and were satisfied with the battery life.

It could be longer, for sure, but it almost has enough juice to make it across the country on an older airplane without charging ports.

Dell Inspiron 13 7000 2-in-1 review

Looks Great, Sounds Bad

Dell proudly touts the Inspiron’s included Standard Waves MaxxAudio Pro audio software for an enhanced "multimedia experience with an impressive soundstage".

Unfortunately, sound is a big disappointment. It’s passable when using the Inspiron in laptop mode, but any deviation in its configuration throws the sound into a garbage can. Or at least, it sounds like it does.

Laptop sound is, for the most part, bad, but in tablet-configuration the Inspiron sounds like a muffled smartphone cupped into your hand. Not pleasant in the slightest, and it really detracts from the otherwise gorgeous screen.

By the way, if you were to decide you really did want to do some more graphically-intense gaming than what’s possible with the on-board graphics, the 17-inch model comes with a dedicated graphics card.

Honestly, though, you’d probably be better off just spending your cash on a laptop built for gaming. A 17-inch 2-in-1 is such an ungainly device, it would rarely see use as a tablet and even a 15-inch 2-in-1 feels just too big.

Verdict

If you’re going back to school and you want a laptop you can easily tuck into your bag or under your arm, the Inspiron is a great choice. It’s a little heavier than its competitors, but is there really any noticeable difference between 2.9 and 3.5 pounds?

The sorts of tasks most people use a computer for – emails, word processing, streaming music and movies – are no challenge for the Inspiron, and the tablet mode gives you that extra bit of flexibility for media consumption.

We liked

The bright, colorful touch screen is great for both work and goofing off. Movies and web content look rich and crisp, and the battery life is sufficient enough to keep you occupied for most of the day.

The attractive, backlit keyboard has great spacing and the keys have just enough travel. Even though we tested the smallest of Dell’s 2-in-1 Inspiron line, the keyboard never feels cramped or crowded.

The tablet and laptop configurations offered me plenty of chances to get work done, then procrastinate, and switch back again. For relaxing and goofing off, tablet mode rules, but for emails and word processing and the sorts of tasks that lead a person to seek an outlet to procrastinate, the Inspiron 13 7000 series is perfectly competent.

We disliked

Storage space is at a premium, and if you want anything above 512GB, your only option is to go with the 17-inch model.

The speakers just don’t complement the rest of the computer. It’s not just a problem for FLAC-loving audiophiles, either. When used as a tablet, it sounds hollow to even untrained ears.

Dell Inspiron 13 7000 2-in-1 review

Final verdict

For light, everyday work tasks, the sort of thing you might do on the train to work, the Inspiron is quite lovely. It’s not too ungainly and it remains cool even when running processor-heavy web applications, making it perfect for working.

The touch-enabled screen and ability to switch into a tablet turns it into a nice little machine to curl up in bed and zone out to an ebook or comic. What we’re trying to say is, the Inspiron 13-7000 series is a competent work laptop in the streets, and a fun tablet in the sheets.

Source: Tech Radar

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Source: CNet