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Biology Lab on Your Christmas List December 11, 2018

We hope you have been good this year because we have a list to start your own biology lab and not everything will fit into Santa’s bag (of holding). If you need some last minute goodie points, Santa loves open-source and people who share on our tip line. Our friends at [The Thought Emporium] have […]

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Wonder Woman is 'queer,' comic book writer says – CNET

Comic book writer Greg Rucka confirms that the famous queen of the Amazons has romantic relationships with women and men.
Source: CNet

Now Nintendo has two irresistible pint-sized game consoles – CNET

Here’s how Nintendo’s upcoming NES Classic Edition will work. Warning: You might be jealous of Japan’s newly announced Nintendo Mini Classic Family Computer.
Source: CNet

AT&T CEO passionately defends Black Lives Matter – CNET

Randall Stephenson shares an emotional plea to start a conversation about race: “Black lives matter. We should not say ‘all lives matter’ to justify ignoring the real need for change.”
Source: CNet

Apple's playing with magnets for future iPads (Apple Byte Extra Crunchy, Ep. 57) – CNET

New MacBook Pros are coming at the end of October, a guy destroys iPhones in an Apple Store — and Apple knows about the iPhone 6 “Touch Disease” issue!
Source: CNet

Pennsylvania mayor's anti-Obama Facebook posts spark outrage – CNET

Technically Incorrect: Charles Wasko, mayor of West York, says he isn’t interested in being politically correct.
Source: CNet

'Marvel's Luke Cage' group-watch starts at 4 p.m. PT – CNET

“Daredevil” and “Jessica Jones” were big hits. Has Netflix done it again with Luke Cage, hard-working street-level superhero? Join us for a live chat as we watch the first episode.
Source: CNet

Donald Trump's social media would doom him in a job interview – CNET

Social media has been Trump’s greatest asset, but could also be his downfall.
Source: CNet

Xbox boss talks Project Scorpio price, suggests it may not be above $600 – CNET

Phil Spencer discusses the price for the “most powerful console ever made.”
Source: CNet

See Apple's huge new auditorium before it's buried forever – CNET

The latest drone flyover of Apple’s new UFO-shaped “Campus 2” shows the Cupertino giant’s new home in the final phases of construction.
Source: CNet

This is the Star Wars R2-D2 coffee maker you've been looking for – CNET

To make great coffee you need filtered water and fresh beans. To make coffee look great, you need ThinkGeek’s Star Wars R2-D2 Coffee Press.
Source: CNet

Latest update to Windows 10 Anniversary causing installation woes for some

Another week, another new Cumulative Update for Windows 10 Anniversary edition. This week’s collection of fixes is causing installation issues for some users.
Source: Microsoft

ISC updates critical DoS bug in BIND DNS software

The Internet Systems Consortium (ISC) patched two vulnerabilities in domain name system software BIND, one of which was referred to as a “critical error condition” in the software.

BIND is the most commonly deployed DNS server on the internet, translating domain names into IP addresses so that users can access applications and remote servers without having to track IP addresses. BIND is the de facto standard on Linux and other Unix-based machines; a vulnerability in the software affects a large number of servers and applications.

The latest BIND update, versions 9.9.9-P3, 9.10.4-P3, and 9.11.0rc3, patched a denial-of-service flaw (CVE-2016-2776) that could be exploited using specially crafted DNS request packets. The issue was uncovered internally by ISC and affects all servers that can receive request packets from any source, ISC said in its advisory. Affected versions include 9.0.x to 9.8.x, 9.9.0 to 9.9.9-P2, 9.9.3-S1 to 9.9.9-S3, 9.10.0 to 9.10.4-P2, and 9.11.0a1 to 9.11.0rc1.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Source: Security

Google dev tools beef up Content Security Policy defenses

Cross-site scripting attacks – the ability to inject unauthorized scripts into web applications – is pervasive, and even though developers have plenty of tools and technologies that can detect and fix XSS flaws, the attacks still keep coming.

Google’s latest developer tools, CSP Evaluator and CSP Mitigator, tackle the XSS problem from a different angle, by shoring up web application defenses to make it harder to execute those malicious scripts.

XSS is among the most common security threats plaguing web applications, and aren’t always the result of sloppy or lazy coding. Developers can avoid mistakes which lead to XSS with modern web technologies such as strict contextual auto-escaping or use automated scanners to catch vulnerabilities during testing.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Source: Security

Google expands Waze ridesharing to all in San Francisco – Roadshow

Google’s ridesharing ambitions appear to be growing. Anyone in the San Francisco area can now hail a ride through the Waze app.
Source: CNet

Refugee camps and city walls show words of hope, anger – CNET

Messages of hope and despair are painted on walls across Europe as the refugee crisis continues to fester.
Source: CNet

Germany taps tech to help refugees find community, fit in – CNET

Sites and apps are popping up to help refugees learn German, navigate the country and meet locals.
Source: CNet

Microsoft seeks testers for 'Project Springfield' bug-detection service

Microsoft is planning to make its internally-used ‘white-box fuzzing’ bug-detection service available to external customers and partners.
Source: Microsoft

Firefox blocks websites with vulnerable encryption keys

To protect users from cryptographic attacks that can compromise secure web connections, the popular Firefox browser will block access to HTTPS servers that use weak Diffie-Hellman keys.

Diffie-Hellman is a key exchange protocol that is slowly replacing the widely used RSA key agreement for the TLS  (Transport Layer Security) protocol. Unlike RSA, Diffie-Hellman can be used with TLS’s ephemeral modes, which provide forward secrecy — a property that prevents the decryption of previously captured traffic if the key is cracked at a later time.

However, in May 2015 a team of researchers devised a downgrade attack that could compromise the encryption connection between browsers and servers if those servers supported DHE_EXPORT, a version of Diffie-Hellman key exchange imposed on exported cryptographic systems by the U.S. National Security Agency in the 1990s and which limited the key size to 512 bits. In May 2015 around 7 percent of websites on the internet were vulnerable to the attack, which was dubbed LogJam.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Source: Security

Mercedes-Benz E-Class All Terrain is one seriously posh Subaru Outback – Roadshow

The Audi Allroad finally has some competition.
Source: CNet

The Renault Trezor Concept is a Formula E car for the road…sort of – Roadshow

With a motorsport-derived powertrain and looks that kill, Renault’s Trezor is one of the best concepts at the Paris Motor Show.
Source: CNet

Samsung apologizes to China over Galaxy Note 7 recall handling – CNET

After a Chinese broadcaster accuses Samsung of neglecting the country during its round of recalls, apologies and explanations, Samsung delivers one.
Source: CNet

Time to welcome October with a Luke Cage marathon – CNET

Social Cues: Twitter bids goodbye to a beloved spacecraft on a comet, and hello to a new Netflix series.
Source: CNet

Trump tweets: Check out sex tape of ex-Miss Universe – CNET

GOP presidential nominee’s early morning rant on Twitter attacks the former Miss Universe and his Democratic rival Hillary Clinton.
Source: CNet

CNET UK podcast 500: Happy 10th birthday to us! – CNET

Celebrate our 500th episode (and 10th anniversary) with this special bumper-sized edition, featuring faces from the past including “Top Gear” host Rory Reid.
Source: CNet

Dear tech industry: Stop renaming stuff all the time. Just. Stop. It.

Google has renamed Google Apps to G Suite. Yeah. Explain that to your users. In this not-really-a-rant rant, David Gewirtz explains how so many product name changes can be a complete and total pain for customers, IT folk, and even purchasing agents.
Source: DIY IT

Review: Updated: Google Apps for Work (G Suite) 2016 review

Review: Updated: Google Apps for Work (G Suite) 2016 review

Latest news

[Editor’s Note: What immediately follows is a rundown of the latest developments and features Google has added to Apps for Work (G Suite) since this review was first written.]

September 2016

  • Google has renamed Apps for Work as G Suite, which the company says better reflects the software’s mission in terms of putting the emphasis on real-time collaboration.
  • Docs, Sheets and Slides witnessed the introduction of a new Explore feature consisting of intelligent assistants that help you craft better documents.
  • A new Quick Access capability was brought to Google Drive. It uses machine learning to automatically surface files it thinks you’ll need next based on your usage patterns.
  • Google rolled out a new offer for users of its productivity suite, with a free 60-day trial of Chrome device management which is good for up to 10 devices.
  • Google Drive made searching easier with the introduction of natural language processing, meaning that you can phrase your search in everyday conversational terms.
  • Google announced a partnership with Box whereby the latter will be integrated with Google Docs, allowing users to edit documents directly from Box’s cloud storage.

August 2016

  • A new Google Hangouts Chrome extension was pushed out allowing for multiple chat windows to be incorporated into one, and making more chat content readily visible.
  • Google introduced a ‘Cast…’ function in the main menu of Chrome, and this can be used to share the contents of a browser tab – or the whole desktop – into a Hangout session.
  • Forms received a new feature which allows the insertion of images into surveys, so you can now do things like have a multiple choice question with pictures for answers.
  • The Android apps for Google Docs, Sheets, and Slides were improved to make it easier to create tables and better looking charts.
  • A couple of security tweaks were applied to Gmail, the most important of which is that the webmail service will now issue a warning about a link if it leads to a known malware site.
  • Inbox got integration with Trello and GitHub, so Trello users will receive a summary of what’s new with projects, and GitHub denizens will get a summary of code changes.
  • Google Drive’s preview feature was improved to make viewing previews of stored files a slicker experience, with a cleaner UI and better zoom functionality.

July 2016

  • Google introduced a new scheme to help train employees on its productivity suite, with the system designed to act like a ‘virtual coach’ to help users learn when IT staff aren’t around.
  • Google tweaked the Admin app for Android to let delegated admins (and not just super admins) use the software to access functions while out and about.
  • Google gave the Admin console some attention in terms of two-step verification, allowing admins to view the real-time status of where each user is in the 2SV enrolment process.
  • Apps for Work is apparently being muscled out by Microsoft’s Office 365, at least if sentiment from Redmond’s Worldwide Partner Conference is on the money.
  • Google launched the new Quizzes feature in the Forms app, designed to allow teachers to easily create and mark assessments for students.

June 2016

  • Google Springboard was announced, a search tool (currently being tested) that can be used to quickly find things across Google Apps, plus it makes proactive recommendations.
  • Google Sites got revamped with a new preview version boasting a simple drag-and-drop design which is more intuitive, and support for real-time collaboration was introduced.
  • A ‘new and notable’ section was introduced to the Google Apps Marketplace, in order to highlight the best third-party apps available to businesses.
  • The Android and iOS apps for Google Docs and Sheets gained the ability to edit content in Print layout view, and to edit existing conditional formatting rules in Sheets.
  • Google tweaked Docs, Sheets and Slides so notifications of comments made not only arrive via email, but you can also get a notification on your Android device or web browser.

May 2016

  • Google announced its new Spaces messaging app designed for small groups – but there’s no news as yet on when (or indeed whether) it will come to Apps for Work.
  • At Google I/O new APIs were introduced for Sheets, giving developers a "new level of access" to some of the most popular features in the app.
  • New APIs were also brought to Slides allowing developers to easily push data from other third-party apps into Slides for maximum convenience.
  • Google revealed that Android apps will be available for Chromebooks, and this opens up more productivity possibilities including using the Android version of Microsoft Word.
  • Google integrated its BigQuery service with Google Drive, allowing users to query files directly from Drive, and save query results from the BigQuery UI directly to Google Sheets.
  • Google Slides benefited from a new Q&A feature that lets audience members submit questions to the speaker directly from their mobile devices during a presentation.
  • The Synergyse service was fully integrated with Google Apps, a virtual assistant that helps train users in the various apps and was previously a Chrome extension.
  • Google Drive and Evernote were integrated, allowing Evernote users to seamlessly access any file on Drive.

April 2016

  • Google Apps for Work received two new certifications: ISO 27017 for cloud security and ISO 27018 for privacy.
  • A new ‘Find a Time’ feature arrived in Google Calendar for Android, allowing mobile users to find convenient times for meetings when they’re on the go.
  • Google’s scheme of providing Apps for free to medium-sized firms who want to migrate over but are locked into an Enterprise Agreement was extended until the end of 2016.
  • Reminders pitched up in the web version of Google Calendar, and said reminders will sync across browsers and mobile devices.

March 2016

  • The Google Admin app received bolstered mobile device management capabilities, allowing for admins to handle security breaches even when they’re out and about.
  • Research into the most-used business apps on the web ranked Google Apps for Work in fourth place – behind Office 365, Salesforce.com and Box.
  • Google launched its #maketime website, which aims to help you prioritise how you spend time during work hours, and highlight how Google Apps for Work can save you time.
  • Google expanded support for its Identity Platform to cover logins for far more third-party apps in the Google Apps Marketplace, including Office 365 and Facebook at Work.
  • A whole bunch of new templates were added to Google Docs, Sheets and Slides.

February 2016

  • Gmail’s existing Data Loss Prevention features got a boost with the addition of OCR for scanning attachments and additional predefined content detectors.
  • Google also gave Gmail the ability to flag email accounts that it deems ‘insecure’.
  • Google Docs was enhanced with voice typing, allowing users to dictate to their word processor, and also access editing and formatting commands.
  • Google Forms gained support for add-ons and the ability to edit Apps Scripts, plus work and education-related templates were introduced to the home screen.
  • The Gmail for Android app received support for rich text formatting, and an option for one-tap instant RSVPs was introduced.

January 2016

  • Instant comments were introduced to Google Docs, allowing users to click a simple icon to add an immediate comment to a document.
  • The ability to add comments arrived in the Sheets and Slides apps for both Android and iOS.
  • Google further bolstered the Sheets Android app with the ability to open and edit CSV and TSV files, along with additional files supported for import and export.
  • Google Calendar for Android and iOS apps was graced with smart suggestions that pop up suggested event titles, places and people.
  • Search became more powerful across Google’s productivity suite, so when users search from Docs, Sheets, and Slides home screens, they get results from across all three apps.
  • Google rejigged device management in the Admin console, categorising the various settings to make everything easier to find.

Now move on to Page 2 for our full review and detailed look at what Google Apps for Work offers, including an evaluation of features, pricing, and ease-of-use.

Darren Allan contributed to this article

Introduction and pricing

For decades, the gold standard of office productivity software has been Microsoft Office – it inherited IBM’s status as the technology nobody got fired for buying. But while Office is undoubtedly powerful, many of its users don’t use many of its features. So why pay for things your organisation doesn’t use?

That’s the rationale behind Google Apps for Work, or G Suite as it is now known. Where Office tries to do everything imaginable, Google’s suite is much more basic. That said, it’s much more powerful than it was when the package debuted in 2006, but the emphasis on simplicity and speed remains.

Apps and pricing

Google Apps for Work (G Suite) is organised into four categories spanning eleven products. Under Communicate you’ll find Gmail, Hangouts and Calendar; under Store there’s Google Drive; under Collaborate there’s Docs, Sheets, Forms, Slides and Sites; and under Manage there’s Admin and Vault. That final one is designed to archive corporate email in organisations that have to retain data for regulatory compliance.

And as ever, the pricing is refreshingly simple. The base product is £3.30 ($5.66) per user per month, and the Premium version is £6.60 ($11.32) per user per month. If your organisation is an educational establishment, Google also has a version for you: Google Apps for Education is free.

While we’re on the subject of free apps, you can of course get Gmail, Docs, Sheets and other Google apps for free – so why spend money? The short answer is that the paid-for version gives you more storage, management, and the ability to use your own domain – so emails come from @yourcompany.com instead of @gmail.com.

Users on the base version of G Suite get 30GB of storage, which is twice the amount of the free products, and users on the Premium version get unlimited storage, while you also get improved admin controls and the Vault email archive. Both the base and premium versions come with HD videoconferencing via Hangouts and 24/7 phone, chat and email support.

Slides

How does it compare to Office?

Google’s main rival here is of course Microsoft, and Redmond’s Office 365 comes with a number of price tags attached depending on which version you want and how many users you’re planning on giving it to.

Microsoft has cut the price of Office 365 to make it more competitive, and it now comes in four tiers: Office 365 Business Essentials, which is £3.10 per user per month; Office 365 Business, which is £7 per user per month; Office 365 Business Premium, which is £7.80 per user per month; and Office 365 Enterprise E3, which is £14.70 per user per month. The first three plans are limited to a maximum of 300 users per year.

The most basic version of Office 365 offers web-based versions of Office apps, 1TB of storage per user plus a 50GB email inbox, unlimited online meetings and HD videoconferencing, plus business-focused social networking for collaborating across departments.

The next step up, Business, offers full Office apps for desktop, laptop, tablet and smartphone along with 1TB of storage, but not the extra 50GB email inboxes. If you want that and the desktop/mobile apps too, you’ll need Office 365 Business Premium. As with Google there’s 24-hour web support and phone support for "critical issues".

One deal-breaker here might be compliance: Microsoft’s compliance tools are limited to the Enterprise product, which is twice the price of Google Apps for Work Premium.

Setup

Setup

The sign-up process takes mere seconds and once you’ve created your account you’ll be taken to the Admin Console. This has eight key options: users, company profile, billing, reports, apps, device management, security and support.

It’s possible to add users in two ways – manually, or by uploading a CSV file containing multiple user details. Once you’ve done that you can then specify which apps they can use, so for example you might want to let users access email but not Google Hangouts. You can also disable unwanted apps globally.

One of the most interesting sections here is Mobile Device Management, which enables you to mandate passwords and Google Sync on user devices, to encrypt data, configure Wi-Fi and to enable or disable automatic syncing and the device’s camera.

You can also remotely wipe devices either manually or automatically if they haven’t been synchronised for a specified period.

Sheets

The Admin Console also contains some additional tools: group creation, third-party apps, domain management and settings for other free Google services such as Google Analytics, AdWords, Google+ and Google App Engine.

The optional Vault, which doubles the per-user price from £3.30 ($5.66) per month to £6.60 ($11.32), is designed for organisations that need to retain email and chat data and other digital information for regulatory compliance.

You can set data retention options globally or based on particular dates, groups or search terms, search the archive using the familiar Google search field, and you can audit the data and export it for further analysis. It doesn’t store all communications, however – any chats marked off the record aren’t stored.

If you’re not sure whether you require Vault or if it isn’t currently necessary, it’s possible to upgrade to the with-Vault version from within your Google Apps for Work (G Suite) Admin Console.

Tools and features

Create: Docs, Sheets, Slides and Sites

Google’s apps come in two forms – cross-platform, browser-based apps and mobile apps for iOS and Android. Microsoft’s mobile OS isn’t supported beyond Google Sync for mail, contacts and calendars.

It’s worth noting that the browser apps only use local storage if you’re using the Chrome browser or Chrome OS, although the standalone Google Drive desktop app keeps everything in sync if you prefer a different web browser (and of course Gmail is widely supported by desktop email software and mobile email apps). The features available offline differ from product to product and platform to platform.

Docs, Sheets and Slides are Google’s equivalents of Word, Excel and PowerPoint, although a more accurate comparison would be to Apple’s most recent iWork apps – the emphasis is on simplicity and ease of use rather than power features.

That’s particularly apparent in Slides, which also appears to prize simplicity over making presentations that don’t look absolutely awful.

We wouldn’t want to craft a massive, complicated manuscript in Docs, but then that isn’t what Docs is designed to do. It’s a fast and user-friendly way to create everyday documents and to share them with colleagues and clients. The companion Drawing app adds functions such as WordArt-style text effects, simple image creation, diagrams and flow charts.

It’s a similar story with Sheets, which covers the most common Excel functions (including pivot tables) but doesn’t have the power of Microsoft’s offering. It is improving, though, and now that it supports Google’s App Script add-ons it’s possible to automate workflows and develop custom apps – although it’s still way behind Microsoft here.

There are two additional apps for creating content: Forms, which as the name suggests is for creating and completing online forms, and Sites, which can be used to create shared pages on the intranet or public internet. Sites is a template-driven affair and while it won’t give professional web designers any nightmares, it’s an effective way to publish web content without any knowledge of web content creation.

Docs

Collaboration and compatibility

Online collaboration has been baked into Google Apps from the outset, and sharing documents with colleagues or clients is effortless. The Revision History panel tracks changes and there’s a separate panel for comments, which can be notified via email as well as in the app.

Sharing is a one-button affair, with options including public, anyone with the correct link, anyone within the organisation, or sharing only with a specified group of people. These options only apply to unpublished documents, however – anything published via the Publish to the Web option, which makes an online copy of the current document, is publicly available.

In addition to the obligatory Microsoft Office formats, Google Apps also supports documents including Open Document Format, Rich Text Format, PDF, plaintext and zipped HTML. Spreadsheets can be saved as CSV and tab-delimited files, and presentations can be output in SVG and PNG formats.

The big selling point here is importing rather than exporting, however – it’s useful to be able to bring non-Google documents into G Suite and make them editable and collaborative.

Google Apps also includes Google’s Hangouts service, which you can make available for text, voice and video calls with anybody or limit conversations to just those people who are members of the same organisation. Hangouts can be shared with up to 15 people and used for video chat, presentation sharing or screen sharing.

Verdict

We liked

Google Apps for Work (G Suite) is very competitively priced and easy to administer. While the various apps aren’t quite as fully featured as power users might like, they’re more than adequate for most everyday office work.

We disliked

The apps may be too simple for some organisations, and not everybody loves Google’s software interface – although it’s much better than it used to be. You also might not be comfortable with the thought that your company’s communications are being scanned by Google.

Final verdict

Rather than be all things to all men and women, Google’s suite is content to cover the basics and to cover them well. It’s fast, lightweight and works on a wide range of devices, and it’s both easy to use and easy to administer.

If Google’s apps cover the features your users will need every day, it’s a very compelling product for SMEs – and with 30 days to put it through its paces without providing any billing details, it’s a product you can test risk-free.

Source: Tech Radar

Renault's Trezor concept packs Formula E drivetrain, slim silhouette – Roadshow

Renault probably doesn’t appreciate it when you keep calling it the “Trevor.”
Source: CNet

What to do when hackers break into your cloud

There are two major types of public cloud computing attacks: single-tenant and cross-tenant. A cross-tenant attack is the stuff of IT nightmares, but it has not yet occurred. (In a cross-tenant attack, the hackers gain root-level access to the cloud and thus access to most or all of the tenants — including you.)

Single-tenant breaches are more likely to occur. In these attacks, the hacker has compromised one or more machine instance, but can’t go beyond that. The most likely cause of a single-tenant breach is that user IDs and passwords have been compromised. That’s typically due to malware or phishing attacks on client devices. In this case, it’s all on you; the cloud provider has done its job, but you haven’t done yours. 

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Source: Security

Lexus' UX Concept is actually pretty scary – Roadshow

Take a good look at that grille before it eats your children.
Source: CNet

Meet Viveport, Vive's app store for virtual reality fans – CNET

Shop aims to help VR enthusiasts explore and create VR content while connecting with other customers.
Source: CNet

CNET giveaway: Water-resistant SanDisk portable solid-state drive – CNET

Win a sturdy all-terrain SanDisk Extreme 510 Portable SSD designed with photographers, videographers and outdoorsy types in mind.
Source: CNet

Asus teams with Secretlab to create slick ROG gaming chairs – CNET

The Taiwanese electronics giant wants to power your gaming computer and support your back at the same time.
Source: CNet

Magician's DEAD is a crazy arcade game that's actually coming to the US – CNET

Magician’s DEAD is a beat ’em up game where you use motion controls to burn, slash and shoot your enemies down.
Source: CNet

Stealing your digital milk: Girt by CNET podcast 89 – CNET

After paying a visit to the truly surreal Woolworths headquarters to check out the new Samsung smart fridge, the Girt Team talks smart home on this week’s show.
Source: CNet

Teddy Ruxpin is coming back and he's got emoji-like eyes – CNET

The talking bear from your 1980s dreams (or nightmares) is all spiffed up and will be back for 2017.
Source: CNet

Yahoo whodunnit: Mystery surrounds hackers behind massive breach – CNET

A cybersecurity company claims it wasn’t state-sponsored hackers who breached Yahoo user data. Yah-who knows?
Source: CNet

Google said to be encouraging Google Home clones – CNET

The Web giant is marshaling the aid of home audio heavy-hitters to challenge the Amazon Echo virtual assistant, Variety reports.
Source: CNet

50 percent of parents knowingly text their teens while the teens are driving – CNET

Technically Incorrect: A new study reveals some stunning statistics about texting behind the wheel and a parent’s role in making it worse.
Source: CNet

Get ready for TV ads and billboards pushing Facebook Live – CNET

It’s all a part of the social network’s effort to get regular people to start live streaming more, according to a report by The Wall Street Journal.
Source: CNet

A Ryder Cup heckler becomes a hero on Twitter – CNET

Technically Incorrect: A man mocks Europe’s professionals about a 12-foot putt they keep missing. So they invite him to try it. Guess what happens next.
Source: CNet

Star Wars Death Star's famed feature was a complete accident – CNET

Film artist Colin Cantwell tells Reddit how the iconic trench came to be. And it turns out the X-Wing owes its life to a night of drinking.
Source: CNet

Spotify joins Japan streaming music fray with karaoke lyrics – CNET

The world’s second-largest music market is worth over $2.5 billion. But Spotify will still have to fight for a big piece of the pie.
Source: CNet

Google's Project Shield defends free speech from botnet scourge – CNET

The effort is designed to save journalists, activists and others from “botnets” of hacked DVRs and security cameras used to swamp websites with data.
Source: CNet

​California tightens background checks on Uber, Lyft drivers – CNET

Governor Jerry Brown signs a new law that will fine ride-hailing companies up to $5,000 per driver if those drivers are found to have criminal histories.
Source: CNet

Microsoft and Salesforce: How the former suitors are once again, disputers

Two years ago, Salesforce was Microsoft’s big buddy, and possibly even a Redmond takeover target. Now it’s trying to derail Microsoft’s LinkedIn deal with anti-competition claims. What happened?
Source: Microsoft

Hiker's dramatic video of two snakes fighting reveals rare sight – CNET

A hiker captures footage of a copperhead grappling with a cottonmouth, perplexing herpetologists in the process.
Source: CNet

Battlefield 1's campaign has five 'war stories' — here's what to expect – CNET

Developer DICE reveals more details on the World War I shooter’s campaign.
Source: CNet

Amber Alerts on mobile now can have link to missing child's pic – CNET

The FCC also increased the length of Wireless Emergency Alerts to 360 characters from 90 for 4G LTE and future cell networks.
Source: CNet

Watch a fool throw an iPhone 7 off the tallest building in the world – CNET

YouTube user TechRax’s latest torture test takes him to the top of the Burj Khalifa in Dubai.
Source: CNet

You've got too much mail! Can AOL save us from email burnout? (Well…) – CNET

AOL’s Alto app tries to cure our email troubles. Meanwhile, Samsung is dealing with bigger problems: exploding washing machines.
Source: CNet