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Reverse Engineering An Old Bus Display December 12, 2019

When his makerspace was gifted a pair of Luminator LED signs of the sort you might see on the front of a bus, [PWalsh] decided to pull one apart to see what made it tick. Along the way, he managed to reverse engineer its control protocol and replace its original control board with a WiFi-connected […]

EFF withdraws Verizon spyware claims – CNET

After Verizon tells the EFF that it’s just testing the app on one phone, the web watchdog pulls its complaint till it can investigate further.
Source: CNet

JBL: Speaker that caught fire in New Jersey home wasn't ours – CNET

A tweet about a flaming speaker caught the attention of the media and created a small firestorm for JBL.
Source: CNet

Take flight with a McLaren 570GT covered in carbon feathers – Roadshow

If this weren’t an April Fools’ Day joke, you could bet that at least one person would show interest in this.
Source: CNet

​Amazon seller wins $6.8M in suit over knockoff sports gear – CNET

As part of a broader crackdown on e-commerce counterfeiters, the maker of TRX sports gear scores big in court.
Source: CNet

​Uber self-driving car project faces injunction in Waymo case – CNET

A judge tells Uber that even though its key witness is pleading the Fifth, its autonomous vehicle project could still be halted.
Source: CNet

Search for elusive Planet 9 gets a crowdsourcing boost – CNET

It seems to be lurking far beyond Pluto. Major efforts are now underway to find it thanks in part to citizen science platform Zooniverse and the BBC.
Source: CNet

Stealing Galaxy S8's thunder? This phone is rumored to have superslim bezels, too – CNET

Xiaomi’s Mi Mix 2 could be the next phone to challenge the Samsung Galaxy S8 and LG G6’s ‘all-screen’ designs.
Source: CNet

South Korea beyond Samsung – CNET

Senior reporter Shara Tibken went to South Korea in pursuit of the Samsung Galaxy S8. She found a whole lot more than phones and factories.
Source: CNet

Broadband providers reaffirm privacy policies amid FCC rules flap – CNET

Comcast, AT&T and Verizon say they don’t collect personal data unless customers allow it.
Source: CNet

'Ghost in the Shell' stares down its critics – CNET

CNET Magazine: Director Rupert Sanders discusses the challenges of bringing anime to life and why he cast Scarlett Johansson as the cyborg Major Kusanagi.
Source: CNet

Russian hacking goes far beyond 2016 pro-Trump effort

As the Senate Intelligence Committee held its first public hearings examining Russian hacking yesterday, lawmakers received a stark warning that the intrusions have been far broader in scope than the intelligence community’s finding that Russian hackers meddled in the 2016 presidential election to help Donald Trump defeat Hillary Clinton.

Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.) seemed to confirm as much when he announced that former aides to his presidential campaign, had been targeted by an apparent cyberattack emanating from a Russian IP address last July and again just this Wednesday.

Clinton Watts, a senior fellow at the Foreign Policy Research Institute, said that his organization in the past week had detected Russian involvement in a social media campaign aimed at discrediting House Speaker Paul Ryan (D-Wis.).

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Source: Security

Rainn Wilson takes on Harry Mudd for 'Star Trek: Discovery' – CNET

“The Office” star Rainn Wilson steps into the iconic and comedic role of Star Trek con-artist Harry Mudd.
Source: CNet

LeBron James says become a scientist, not an NBA player – CNET

Commentary: A new Verizon spot, debuting during March Madness, suggests that there are too few glamorous jobs, so head for science and technology.
Source: CNet

Comcast, AT&T reaffirm privacy policies amid flap over FCC rules – CNET

The broadband providers say they don’t collect personal data unless customers allow it.
Source: CNet

Watch how upset people get when their phones are wiped – CNET

Commentary: A Kodak prank ad in the UK shows the sheer agony of your digital life disappearing before your very eyes.
Source: CNet

Jaguar will sell you a like-new E-Type for $356,000 – Roadshow

It will build 10 E-Types as part of the Jaguar Reborn program.
Source: CNet

IDG Contributor Network: Biometrics can provide better data provenance

Imagine these scenarios:

  • Insiders at a financial institution place transactions using e-execution and then deny involvement when trades lose money.
  • Regulated individuals share secrets and collude to fix pricing via messaging services.
  • Fraud occurs through re-diverted funds within Treasury departments.
  • Funds are embezzled or re-directed for personal gain.
  • Confidential data is accessed for market price fixing, front running or gaining market advantage
  • Executives request staff members to access confidential or highly secure content to create a more simplistic briefing process.
  • Data is accessed and leaked for personal benefit.

The common denominator to every one of these scenarios is individuals denying their involvement or abdicating responsibility in a transaction. These types of acts are happening every day across virtually every industry — pharma, finance, the public sector — costing companies incredible amounts of money to investigate and putting operating licenses at risk.

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Source: Security

Dear Crayola, I refuse to retire! Signed, the Dandelion crayon – CNET

Go back to the drawing board, Crayola, because this decision is cray-cray. All that, and the new crayon isn’t even announced.
Source: CNet

Streaming TV's next big entrant may be Verizon – CNET

The company is reportedly securing streaming rights, in hopes of launching a new internet TV service this summer.
Source: CNet

Honda's 'horn emojis' are eerily unsettling – Roadshow

Thankfully, it’s just a premature April Fools’ Day prank.
Source: CNet

Relive the greatest April Fools' web pranks of all time – CNET

Remember when Google announced a Mars colony and the BBC filmed a flock of rare flying penguins? Join us as we revisit some of the greatest April Fools’ Day jokes to ever spread online.
Source: CNet

Senator: Russia used 'thousands' of internet trolls during US election

The Russian government used “thousands” of internet trolls and bots to spread fake news, in addition to hacking into political campaigns leading up to the 2016 U.S. election, according to one lawmaker.

Disinformation spread on social media was designed to raise doubts about the U.S. election and the campaign of Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton, said Senator Mark Warner, a Virginia Democrat.

“This Russian propaganda on steroids was designed to poison the national conversation in America,” Warner said Thursday during a Senate hearing on Russian election hacking. The Russian government used “thousands of paid internet trolls” and bots to spread disinformation on social media.

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Source: Security

Apple to open first R&D center in Indonesia this year – CNET

The US tech giant seeks to comply with Indonesian regulations in order to be able to retail phones in the country.
Source: CNet

Want privacy? Congress says you'll have to pay for it

When Congress voted down broadband privacy regulations this week, it threw data security under the bus as well. Internet users who want to protect their data can expect to pay a “privacy tax” as a result.

The House voted 215-205 to repeal rules that, among other things, required broadband providers to take “reasonable” steps to protect customers’ information. The rules also would have mandated that telecoms notify customers within 30 days “after reasonable determination of [a data] breach.” And if a breach affected at least 5,000 customers, they would have had to notify the FBI, the Secret Service, and the FCC within seven business days. The privacy rules regarding notifications were slated to take effect in June.

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Source: Security

Jenkins users can shore up software security with plugins

Developers keep finding new ways to deliver higher-quality software faster—and automation is playing a big part in that transformation. But to avoid introducing new flaws at that same hurry-up pace, security needs to be integrated directly into the development lifecycle.

For many modern dev shops, Jenkins has become the open source engine of CI/CD (continuous integration/continuous delivery). Jenkins and its community have given rise to hundreds of plugins, including those that automate security. There’s no reason why repetitive tasks, such as determining how an application handles malicious inputs or checking for known vulnerable components, must be performed manually. Jenkins’ thriving marketplace of plugins can deliver the automated security testing you need.

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Source: Security