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LinkedIn says it will stop repeatedly copying iOS clipboard July 3, 2020

Photo by Thomas Trutschel/Photothek via Getty Images LinkedIn plans to stop its app from repeatedly copying the contents of an iOS device’s clipboard, after a user highlighted the seemingly privacy-invasive practice earlier this week. ZDNet reports that LinkedIn called the behavior a bug. The app copies clipboard contents in order to perform an “equality check” […]

415,000 routers worldwide hijacked to secretly mine cryptocurrency


Researchers have discovered over 415,000 routers across the globe have been infected with malware designed to steal their computing power and secretly mine cryptocurrency. The attack, which is still ongoing, affects MikroTik routers in particular. For the record, the string of crypto-jacking attacks on the brand first began in August, when security experts discovered over 200,000 devices had been infected. The number has more than doubled since then. While the majority of affected devices was initially concentrated in Brazil, data suggests there are tons of affected devices worldwide. It is worth pointing out that the number of breached devices might be…

This story continues at The Next Web

415,000 routers worldwide hijacked to secretly mine cryptocurrency
Source: The Next Web

Facebook spreads group stories globally – CNET

You can make short-lived contributions no matter where you are. Facebook spreads group stories globally – CNET
Source: CNet

When Captain Marvel green suit leaked, Brie Larson ignored social media – CNET

Larson is active on Twitter, except when paparazzi are on set. When Captain Marvel green suit leaked, Brie Larson ignored social media – CNET
Source: CNet

Blockchain startups forced to lay off staff to survive the bear market


The bear market – which many optimistically hoped would only span a few months – has swallowed the entire year, and with it, a string of cryptocurrency projects The latest casualty is ETCDEV, the development team for much of the software adopted by notable alt-coin Ethereum Classic. According to a recent post, the group simply does not have enough funds to continue building on the fledgling blockchain, and has officially closed its doors. This news comes just days after appealing to its community for potential donations. Unfortunately ETCDEV cannot continue to work in the current situation and has to announce shutdown of our…

This story continues at The Next Web

Blockchain startups forced to lay off staff to survive the bear market
Source: The Next Web

Google launches Flutter 1.0, its Android and iOS mobile app SDK, as Square announces two new Flutter SDKs for easy payments (Emil Protalinski/VentureBeat)


Emil Protalinski / VentureBeat:

Google launches Flutter 1.0, its Android and iOS mobile app SDK, as Square announces two new Flutter SDKs for easy payments  —  At Flutter Live in London today, Google launched version 1.0 of Flutter, the company’s open source mobile UI framework that helps developers build native interfaces for Android and iOS.

Google launches Flutter 1.0, its Android and iOS mobile app SDK, as Square announces two new Flutter SDKs for easy payments (Emil Protalinski/VentureBeat)
Source: Tech Meme

Google launches Flutter 1.0 — its fast, powerful cross-platform app UI toolkit


Today, at the Flutter Live event in London, Google announced the first stable release of Flutter, its cross-platform UI toolkit. Flutter is intended to help developers build attractive, native app experiences from a single codebase. While cross-platform UI toolkits are nothing new, Flutter is unique in how it emphasizes speed and developer control above all else. UI elements can take advantage of GPU rendering, as Flutter uses the same Skia 2D graphics engine as Google and Android. In addition, Flutter compiles natively to 32-bit or 64-bit ARM code for both Android and iOS. And unlike other cross-platform toolkits, Flutter does this…

This story continues at The Next Web

Google launches Flutter 1.0 — its fast, powerful cross-platform app UI toolkit
Source: The Next Web

The Circuit Sculpture Contest

Many artists are inseparably associated with their medium: Vincent Van Gogh had oil paint, Auguste Rodin had bronze, and Banksy has the spraycan and stencil. You have ICs, passives, wire, and solder. So often electronics are hidden away, but not today! We want to see you build electronic circuits that are beautiful in and of themselves.

This is Hackaday’s Circuit Sculpture Contest and we bet you already have everything you need to enter. Leave behind the drab flatland of 2D PCBs and break out into the third dimension! Or break away from the PCB entirely. Our inspiration comes from a few recently featured projects by Mohit Bhoite and by Eirik Brandal that show functional electronic circuits supported by their own wiring:


There’s something beautiful in these works. They take what would be unnoticed traces and bring them to the forefront of the project. The core of the challenge is simple: built a sculpture where an electronic circuit is the main building material (or medium if you prefer the artistic vernacular).

Prizes and How to Enter

Head over to Hackaday.io and publish a project page that shows off your circuit sculpture — enter using the “Submit Project To:” dropdown on the left sidebar of your project page.

There are no strict requirements for what information you share but here’s some advice on wooing the judges: We want to see what you went through during the project. Show off your planning, the method you used to fabricate it, share a schematic if you can. Tell the story like you would if standing around the workshop with your best friend.

  • 3 Exceptional Entries will each win a $200 cash prize

  • 4 Runners-up will each win a $100 Tindie gift certificate

Full contest rules are available on the contest page.

Your circuit must do something…

Even if that’s just lighting up an LED, your sculpture must also be a functional circuit. Judges will primarily consider the art of your creation, but will also take into consideration the complexity of this circuit. But this really isn’t about who wins. Beautify is in the eye of the beholder, and we’ve see a lot of ugly projects that are unmistakably beautiful!

What counts as a sculpture?

We’re looking for projects that get away from traditional circuit board layout and make something beautiful from the components and the connections themselves. The most obvious is flywire sculptures like the ones above, but we think projects that involve circuit boards could still do well in this contest — think Cordwood or other methods where the PCBs aren’t the center of attention or constrained to one plane. We also think Manhattan-style, and dead-bug style builds can be a thing of beauty, so these will be considered as well.



The point is, push the boundaries of your creativity! Components and wire are cheap, so test out your ideas, iterate on your successful tests, and I be you’ll surprise yourself with what you can accomplish. What you see above is the result of the same first steps. This is Hackaday; we want to see those tentative first steps as much as we do the finished products because great ideas come from so many places. Good luck!

The Circuit Sculpture Contest
Source: HackADay

Researching Supersonic Flight

This image of the horizon is as it was seen from the cockpit of NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center’s F/A-18 research aircraft. Researching Supersonic Flight
Source: NASA

Microsoft pours mockery on the iPad, says it's a kid's toy

In a new ad, Redmond is scathing about Apple’s latest tablet. Microsoft pours mockery on the iPad, says it's a kid's toy
Source: ZDNet Microsoft

Dyson unveils new Pure Hot+Cool, a $650 heating fan and air purifier


A couple of months ago, I reviewed Dyson’s Pure Cool fan and air purifier combination, which I quite liked and seemed to help manage my dog’s allegies. Now that winter has a come, Dyson is updating its family with something more fit to the season: The company is today introducing the Pure Hot+Cool, a follow up on its original Pure Hot+Cool Link. As you’ve probably guessed from the name, this wind machine also works as a space heater. The specs are largely similar to the Pure Cool, with a HEPA filter that Dyson claims captures 99.97 percent of particles at…

This story continues at The Next Web

Dyson unveils new Pure Hot+Cool, a 0 heating fan and air purifier
Source: The Next Web

Microsoft open sources key Windows UX Frameworks, launches first Visual Studio 2019 preview

Microsoft is open sourcing WPF, Windows Forms and Win UI via GitHub and making available the first public preview of Visual Studio 2019. Microsoft open sources key Windows UX Frameworks, launches first Visual Studio 2019 preview
Source: ZDNet Microsoft

Go Up A Creek Without A Paddle

Kayaks are a some of the most versatile watercraft around. You can fish from them, go on backpacking trips, or just cruise around your local lake for a few hours. They’re inexpensive, lightweight, don’t require fuel, and typically don’t require a license or insurance to operate. They also make a great platform for a solar-powered boat like this one with only 150 watts of panels and a custom-built motor with parts from an RC airplane.

[William Frasier] built his solar-powered kayak using three solar panels, two mounted across the bow of the boat using pontoons to keep them from dipping into the water, and the other mounted aft. Separating the panels like this helps to prevent all three of them being shaded at once when passing under bridges. They’re all wired in parallel to a 12V custom-built motor which is an accomplishment in itself. It uses custom-turned parts from teak, a rot-resistant wood, is housed in an aluminum enclosure, and uses an RC airplane propeller for propulsion.

Without using the paddles and under full sun, the kayak can propel itself at about 4 knots (7 kmh) which is comparable to a kayak being propelled by a human with a paddle. With a battery, some of the shading problems could be eliminated, and adding an autopilot to it would make it almost 100% autonomous.

Go Up A Creek Without A Paddle
Source: HackADay

Google CEO Sundar Pichai will testify to Congress on Dec. 11

Google chief executive Sundar Pichai is now slated to testify to Congress on Tuesday, December 11, after lawmakers rescheduled their original hearing in light of former President George H.W. Bush’s death. Google CEO Sundar Pichai will testify to Congress on Dec. 11
Source: Washington Post Tech

This hoverboard is only $99. Here's why you should buy it – CNET

Go ahead and make your fire jokes — this is a great deal on a self-balancing scooter. Plus: free cookies and a super-cheap OBD2 car scanner! This hoverboard is only . Here's why you should buy it – CNET
Source: CNet

Hackaday Visits the Electric City

Much to the chagrin of local historians, the city of Scranton, Pennsylvania is today best known as the setting for the American version of The Office. But while the exploits of Dunder Mifflin’s best and brightest might make for a good Netflix binge, there’s a lot more to the historic city than the fictional paper company. From its beginnings as a major supplier of anthracite coal to the introduction of America’s first electrically operated trolley system on its streets, Scranton earned its nickname “The Electric City” by being a major technological hub from the Industrial Revolution through to the Second World War.

Today, the mines and furnaces of Scranton lie silent but not forgotten. In the 1980’s, the city started turning what remained of their industrial sites into historic landmarks and museums with the help of State and Federal grants. I recently got a chance to tour some of these locations, and came away very impressed. They’re an exceptional look into the early technology and processes which helped turn America into an industrial juggernaut.

While no substitute for visiting these museums and parks for yourself, hopefully the following images and descriptions will give you an idea of what kind of attractions await visitors to the modern day Electric City.

Lackawanna Coal Mine Tour

As Scranton is best known for its anthracite coal, it seems fitting to start with the “Lackawanna Coal Mine Tour” located in McDade Park. This abandoned mine was opened to the public as a museum in 1985 so that visitors could see what it was like to actually work hundreds of feet underground inside of a coal vein. Though it should be said that the experience for the actual miners, who worked the mine from 1860 all the way up until 1966, wasn’t quite so luxurious. Electric lighting and reinforcing timbers were added for the safety of visitors; the actual miners worked in complete darkness and without the comforting presence of the overhead supports.

On the surface there are various pieces of equipment on display and a small museum with requisite gift shop, but the main attraction is what’s known as the “#190 slope”. Visitors are issued hardhats and pile into a squat yellow vehicle that descends the slope to a depth of approximately 76 meters (250 feet) below the ground. Most people never get the opportunity to travel this far below the Earth’s surface, so to say it’s a unique experience is something of an understatement.

At this depth it’s always about 12 C (54 F) and water constantly runs down the walls at an alarming rate and with an unnerving sound. Despite the millions of dollars invested in turning the mine into an attraction for the public, it’s not always easy to navigate its meandering tunnels. The ground is occasionally uneven and loose, and at points the ceiling is very low. Even with the lighting installed at regular intervals, sections of the mine are still incredibly dark, and it can be difficult to see low outcroppings of rock.





 

Anthracite Heritage Museum

Also located in McDade Park, the “Anthracite Heritage Museum” features exhibits dedicated to the technology used to mine and utilize coal. Hardware that would have been used in or around the mine such as drills, crushers, and conveyor belts are on display. Most of the equipment is shown in tableau, which allows the visitors see how the pieces of machinery would have worked together to release the coal from the Earth and transport it up and out of the mine.





Electric City Trolley Museum

This museum is dedicated, as the name implies, to the electric trolley system which helped put Scranton on the map in the 1880’s. Highlights include a restored trolley featuring a cut-away so visitors can inspect the motor and gearing system, an explanation of contemporary power handling equipment, and a wide array of ancillary equipment on display such as relays and transformers.

The Trolley Museum is a wonderland for those who are interested in high voltage or turn of the century technology, and they even offer (for an additional fee and subject to weather) excursion trips on early 20th century trolleys. But it should be said it’s one of the smaller museums in the city, and visitors shouldn’t expect to spend more than an hour or two here if you aren’t taking one of the trips.





Steamtown National Historic Site

Truth be told, I wasn’t terribly keen on visiting what I perceived to be a “Train Museum” at first. There are many people who are fascinated with trains and the romance of old-time steam locomotives, but I’m certainly not one of them. I assumed the “Steamtown National Historic Site” would be of limited interest to me, but being highly recommended and part of the National Park Service, it seemed like I’d have to at least give it a chance. Besides, admittance is free.

In the end I’m very glad my general disinterest in the iron horse didn’t keep me from visiting. In all honesty, I don’t remember the last time I was so impressed with a museum. The presentation and attention to detail at Steamtown is absolutely phenomenal. I came in with a vague understanding of how these vehicles operated, and left with a deep respect for the engineering required to not only construct these behemoths in their prime, but continue to run and maintain them into the present day.

The term “up close and personal” really describes the experience here perfectly. You’ll get not only the opportunity to take a ride on a nearly 100 year old coal-fired steam train but stand mere feet away from the beasts as they meander through the complex, whistles screaming and pistons pounding. Even if you’ve got zero interest in these machines going into the museum, it’s exceptionally difficult not to be in awe of them when you can feel the heat of the boiler and smell the coal burning.

While the trains themselves are probably the biggest draw, the exhibits inside the museum are also fantastic. A good portion of them are dedicated to the socioeconomic aspects of rail travel in 1900’s America, but there’s also an entire wing devoted to train technology. Here every system of the locomotive is broken down and explained, as are the more practical aspects of running the rail service such as signaling. A major highlight of the technology wing is a locomotive which was fully restored and then cut in half down the length, so visitors can look inside its major components to better understand not only their inner-workings but their enormous scale.




Worth the Trip

These are arguably the best known of the museums in and around Scranton, but by no means the only ones. I simply ran out of time during my stay, and didn’t get to check out a few of the other museums or attractions that had caught my eye, notably the iron furnaces. To fully explore just the locations I’ve listed here you should plan on a stay of two or three days, especially as some of the museums close by early evening. If you want to take the train or trolley excursions, each one of those will eat up most of the day itself.

Beyond the historical and technological attractions, I found Scranton to be a charming place with a surprisingly vibrant nightlife in the city center. This is a particularly nice counterbalance if your traveling companions aren’t necessarily the type to enjoy exploring a coal mine all day. I fully expect to return to Scranton in the future to hit a few of the spots I missed this time around, and I’d wholeheartedly recommend it as a destination for anyone in the market for a somewhat rural vacation with a side of century old technology.

Hackaday Visits the Electric City
Source: HackADay

Mission: Impossible is coming to VR – CNET

It’s coming to a retail space and sofa near you — if you choose to accept it. Mission: Impossible is coming to VR – CNET
Source: CNet

Hollywood is trying to fix its diversity problem, though not fast enough – CNET

The lack of representation is a huge issue in the entertainment industry, but there are people trying to tackle it. Hollywood is trying to fix its diversity problem, though not fast enough – CNET
Source: CNet

Microsoft's 'Centaurus' device is yet another potential piece of its Chromebook-compete strategy

Microsoft’s successor to its ‘Andromeda’ dual-screened foldable device is codenamed ‘Centaurus.’ It’s just one element of Microsoft’s evolving Chromebook-compete strategy. Microsoft's 'Centaurus' device is yet another potential piece of its Chromebook-compete strategy
Source: ZDNet Microsoft

Top IoT messaging protocols are laughably insecure, Trend Micro research shows


Japanese cybersecurity firm Trend Micro today published a report on the state of IoT security. The company found that two of the leading machine-to-machine (M2M) protocols have inherent design issues, and are frequently deployed in an insecure manner. According to Trend Micro’s report, The Fragility of Industrial IoT’s Data Backbone, the issues lie with two popular M2M protocols — Message Queueing Telemetry Transport (MQTT) and Constrained Application Protocol (CoAP). These are frequently used in IoT devices, particularly those found within an industrial context. The report, which was written by researchers Federico Maggi and Rainer Vosseler, states that using simple keyword…

This story continues at The Next Web

Top IoT messaging protocols are laughably insecure, Trend Micro research shows
Source: The Next Web

Munich-based Freeletics, which provides AI-powered mobile fitness plans tailored to individual users, raises $45M Series A (Kate Clark/TechCrunch)


Kate Clark / TechCrunch:

Munich-based Freeletics, which provides AI-powered mobile fitness plans tailored to individual users, raises $45M Series A  —  One of Europe’s most popular fitness applications is poised to flourish in the U.S. market with the help of several Los Angeles-based investors.

Munich-based Freeletics, which provides AI-powered mobile fitness plans tailored to individual users, raises M Series A (Kate Clark/TechCrunch)
Source: Tech Meme

Javascript and jQuery keep the web alive. It’s why you should learn them now for $29


JavaScript and its super-efficient application aide jQuery are virtual musts in your toolbox. Now, you can learn ‘em both — in just an hour each. Those are just two of the courses in this extensive collection of instruction we call the Complete Javascript and jQuery Programming bundle.

Javascript and jQuery keep the web alive. It’s why you should learn them now for
Source: The Next Web

Review of $349 Nokia 7.1: has a sharp and colorful screen, snappy performance, and fast software updates due to Android One, making for a great value smartphone (Jacob Kastrenakes/The Verge)


Jacob Kastrenakes / The Verge:

Review of $349 Nokia 7.1: has a sharp and colorful screen, snappy performance, and fast software updates due to Android One, making for a great value smartphone  —  But what’s on the inside matters, too  —  What matters more: how a phone looks or how it performs?

Review of 9 Nokia 7.1: has a sharp and colorful screen, snappy performance, and fast software updates due to Android One, making for a great value smartphone (Jacob Kastrenakes/The Verge)
Source: Tech Meme

Facebook makes Collections shareable, allowing users to share gift ideas or shopping lists with friends (Anthony Ha/TechCrunch)


Anthony Ha / TechCrunch:

Facebook makes Collections shareable, allowing users to share gift ideas or shopping lists with friends  —  This holiday season, Facebook is hoping you’ll use a relatively little-known feature to share your gift ideas.  —  With collections, users can already save Facebook content …

Facebook makes Collections shareable, allowing users to share gift ideas or shopping lists with friends (Anthony Ha/TechCrunch)
Source: Tech Meme

Cryptocurrency whales increase Ethereum stacks by 80% in 2018


There’s no doubt the 2018 bear market has been rough, but some cryptocurrency traders have been taking advantage. Actively trading whales have accumulated more Ethereum this year than at any other time in its history. Blockchain research unit Diar analysed more than 5200 Ethereum addresses to discover cryptocurrency whales who trade regularly are sitting on 80 percent more ETH than the start of the year. In fact, these whales now own over 20 million ETH ($2.2 billion), roughly 20 percent of Ethereum’s circulating supply. This represents a four-fold increase in ETH held by top cryptocurrencers since January 2017, when they owned…

This story continues at The Next Web

Cryptocurrency whales increase Ethereum stacks by 80% in 2018
Source: The Next Web

Inside Google's Area 120, the company's in-house startup incubator founded in 2016 that has since greenlighted about 50 projects by Google employees (Harry McCracken/Fast Company)


Harry McCracken / Fast Company:

Inside Google’s Area 120, the company’s in-house startup incubator founded in 2016 that has since greenlighted about 50 projects by Google employees  —  Google’s “20% time“-the long-standing perk that invites employees to carve off a fifth of their working hours to devote to personal projects …

Inside Google's Area 120, the company's in-house startup incubator founded in 2016 that has since greenlighted about 50 projects by Google employees (Harry McCracken/Fast Company)
Source: Tech Meme

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