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The iPhone 6 is now a vintage Apple product September 30, 2022

Apple has officially added the iPhone 6 to its list of vintage devices.

Trump campaign turns to Instagram and the Trump kids to win over young voters – CNET

Technically Incorrect: An ad targeted at millennials attempts to show that the three adult Trump children are what those millennials should aspire to be.
Source: CNet

Make Time Lord treats with this 'Doctor Who' cookbook – CNET

“Doctor Who: The Official Cookbook” features “wibbly-wobbly timey-wimey recipes” fit for any fans craving fish fingers and custard.
Source: CNet

Disguise your voice with this Star Wars Death Trooper mask – CNET

Frighten your friends and creep out the neighbors by altering your voice and looking like an Imperial Death Trooper straight from “Rogue One: A Star Wars Story.”
Source: CNet

Apple's Twitter account rises from the dead — sort of – CNET

Technically Incorrect: Having been dormant for years, Apple’s feed suddenly begins to edify just days before the iPhone unveiling. Except it isn’t edifying with the usual tweets.
Source: CNet

Consumer Reports criticizes Samsung Galaxy Note recall – CNET

Technically Incorrect: The consumer rights organization says that Samsung should be working with US authorities to ensure consumer safety.
Source: CNet

​Pay what you want for this Mad Magazine Humble Bundle – CNET

This bundle of magazines delivers Mad’s satirical takes on “South Park,” Justin Bieber and Dane Cook, to name a few, while raising money for the Comic Book Legal Defense Fund.
Source: CNet

Apple's top lawyer fires back at EU over tax ruling – CNET

After being told the company owes $14.5 billion in back taxes, Apple’s general counsel says the European Commission has its numbers wrong.
Source: CNet

Refugees and tech: Scenes from a Greek tragedy – CNET

What happens when war, escape and hope intersect in our age of advanced technologies? We traveled to Greece and found out.
Source: CNet

Greece's refugee crisis through a different lens – CNET

Commentary: For Road Trip 2016, I went to Greece to find out how the government, activists and migrants are applying technology to ease the refugee crisis. It wasn’t what I expected.
Source: CNet

Hands-on review: Jide Remix Mini

Hands-on review: Jide Remix Mini

The history of alternative operating systems is littered with dead bodies from big and small companies – from the mighty IBM and the mightier Intel to smaller corpses (Lindows anyone?), there have been dozens of companies trying to break the stranglehold of Microsoft back in the day, then Google’s Android later on.

Failure to do so could vaporise tens of billions of pounds off a company’s value; Nokia and Motorola know a thing or two about that.

Now, a small company called Jide is trying to challenge both Microsoft and Google with a little operating system called Remix OS. In reality, the latter is not an entirely new venture but is, in fact, based on Google’s Android which is itself an open source project.

We came across Jide and Remix OS a few weeks ago when reviewing the Onda OBook 10 SE (check the review for a bit more background) and this time around, Gearbest sent us a sample of Jide’s very own take on the modern computer, the Remix Mini PC which is the product of a successful Kickstarter campaign.

At just over £40 including delivery (around $52, AU$70), it is one of the cheapest mini PCs on the market, regardless of the OS, to offer 2GB of RAM. Note that if you’re thinking of a purchase, we strongly advise you to read our article on the pros and cons of buying from Chinese retailers (and generally speaking, outside of the UK).

The Remix Mini looks like a pebble from afar, with a curved body devoid of any edges as such. Black in colour, it comes with a 10W (5V2A) power supply unit and an HDMI cable as well as a couple of leaflets.

Jide Remix Mini ports

There’s a green status LED at the front, a pair of USB 2.0 ports on the back together with a full-size HDMI connector, an audio port, a microSD card slot and a 10/100Mbps Ethernet port.

Our model came with 2GB of RAM and 16GB on-board storage. A cheaper variant with half the memory and half the storage is also available although we’d strongly advise you to avoid it.

Both models come with a quad-core Allwinner system-on-chip based on ARM’s Cortex-A53 technology and clocked at 1.2GHz. Because the device doesn’t have an active fan, it ran a tad warm in operation; although not to any worrying extent.

Jide Remix Mini top

As expected, you get 802.11n Wi-Fi as well as Bluetooth 4.0. The Remix Mini supports 4K decoding but since it can only output at full HD, this won’t matter much.

Using the device was very intuitive – just plug in everything and switch it on by tapping on the Remix logo on top. Jide opted for a capacitive button which we disliked thoroughly as merely touching the logo would send the device to sleep.

We updated the Remix OS to version 2.0.604 (based on Android 5.1) and there is an option to enrol in a scheme similar to Microsoft’s Windows Insider program, allowing you to beta test the operating system. The update process took minutes rather than hours as some reported online, with a fairly straightforward setup.

Compared to stock Android, Remix OS offers useful features such as native multi-tasking, a file manager, a taskbar, an option bar on the right, right click menu, shortcuts and a start menu that make it look more like Windows than anything produced by Google.

Jide Remix Mini underside

Windows can be resized, minimised and maximised – snap to borders and Windows-based resizing shortcuts didn’t work, though. Applications bundled included the usual suspects from Google (Play Store, Movies, Docs, Sheets, Gmail and Chrome) as well as a flurry of others from partners, one of which is Kodi.

Performance was acceptable and, in a thin client configuration, would be more than adequate. Even on a full HD display, light web browsing or playing YouTube videos proved to be as intuitive as on an Android tablet, except you do it with a keyboard and a mouse rather than a touchscreen display.

Early verdict

Devices like the Remix Mini could transform Google’s Android into a very cheap, almost free alternative to Windows for very small businesses that require internet access or operate mostly in the cloud.

The fact that it can be plugged into most recent displays with an HDMI connector paves the way for some interesting configurations like powering a digital signage solution or a standalone kiosk. Having a wired connectivity option (hello Ethernet port) and no fans or vents does help as well.

It’s hard to fault the Remix Mini at this price – especially with the desktop experience – and the productivity aspect is particularly enticing if you are already using Google Apps, Microsoft Office Mobile or OfficeSuite.

That said, Chrome OS is fairly similar to Remix OS – both are designed as ‘desktopified’ Android – and while devices running the former might not be as affordable as the Remix Mini, the fact is that you can go in a high street store and buy one like the Lenovo N22 Chromebook.

For small businesses, there’s also the appeal of having a company like Google providing support for Chrome OS rather than a much smaller company in a far, far away country.

Source: Tech Radar

Star Trek stars spill insider tales of epic ad-libs, favorite captains – CNET

It’s been 50 years since Star Trek debuted. During the next week, a dozen former cast members reveal which Trek tech they most want to see in real life and why they think the world’s still captivated by the beloved franchise.
Source: CNet

How Star Trek's Worf wasn't a wuss thanks to Michael Dorn – CNET

The star of “Star Trek: The Next Generation” talks about his first years on the show, how he turned Worf into a lovable character and why he loves his Tesla Model S.
Source: CNet

Looking for big iPhone changes? Wait till next year – CNET

Apple will introduce its latest phone on Wednesday. But this year could see another “S” — as in “snooze” — release.
Source: CNet

Parody video pokes fun at the perils of Pokemon Go – CNET

This fan-made Pokemon Go commercial mirrors real-life dangers faced by clueless players who end up drowning, falling off cliffs and walking into traffic while trying to capture digital creatures.
Source: CNet

Hands-on review: HP 250 G4

Hands-on review: HP 250 G4

Small businesses have a number of choices these days when it comes to outfitting employees with affordable computers. HP has thrown another option into the ring with its 250 G4, an affordable budget laptop that comes with a full-fat Intel Core processor that’s more capable of handling business applications compared to others in its price range.

HP 250 G4

It can be picked up for as little as £224 (around US$269) online, which places it squarely in budget territory and even on an even footing with Chromebooks and low-end 2-in-1 devices.

In terms of its design, the 15.6-inch 250 G4 looks like a budget offering. That’s not saying much these days, with bargain bucket devices such as HP’s own Stream 11 and Stream 14 bringing a splash of color to the low-end. Howeverr, the 250 G4 really is clad in black plastic from head-to-toe (or lid to keyboard base). HP has attempted to make it look less boring by giving the black base a thatched diamond effect, which is repeated in a silver mesh pattern on the lid, but it doesn’t prevent the machine from looking dull.

HP 250 G4

Build quality is impressive for the price. There are signs of flex around the edges of the lid and base if you try to bend them with enough force, but the keyboard area stands up well to contortion. The 250 G4 is so clad in plastic that picking up scuffs over time is inevitable. Despite its plastic exterior, it’s not a light device, tipping the scales at 2.8 pounds.

HP 250 G4

Even at the low-end, laptop makers have reduced the travel of their device’s keyboards – and the 250 G4 is no exception. Its chiclet-spaced keys are of a decent size and typing is as pleasurable and fast as you will experience on a laptop in this price category. There’s a roomy trackpad underneath that refrains from sticking as you scroll across it, and is paired with click buttons that both feel and sound cheap to use.

HP 250 G4

There’s not much to shout about where the G410’s display is concerned. Its lowly pixel-resolution of 1,366 x 768 is too cramped for multi-tasking and makes it difficult to pin apps or browsers side-by-side to use simultaneously. However, this is compensated somewhat by the display’s high peak brightness which makes it easy to read websites, menus and labels without eye fatigue.

HP 250 G4

Horizontal viewing angles are average at best due to the TN panel used, and vertical ones are even worse. Color saturation and contrast is sufficient for everyday web browsing and general use, but you would be better off hooking up a desktop monitor for image editing.

HP 250 G4

The good news is that you can at least hook up the G410 to an external display using either the VGA or HDMI port build along the left-hand edge. They’re accompanied by an ethernet port, two USB 2.0 ports, in addition to an optical drive, another USB port and an SDcard slot.

HP 250 G4

Benchmarks

  • Cinebench R15: OpenGL: 24.6 fps; CPU: 207 points
  • Geekbench (Single-Core): 2,072 points; (Multi-Core) 4,292 points
  • Battery test (1080p looped video streamed over Wi-Fi in Edge, 50% brightness): 3 hours 50 minutes

The real start of the show here is the HP 250 G4’s Intel Core i3-5005U (dual core, 2GHz) processor, which is backed up by a healthy 8GB of RAM. These components aren’t going to give you powerhouse performance, but having a full-fat Intel Core processor tucked away inside at this price point is a rarity. There’s usually one of Intel’s Celeron or Bay Trail variants instead. When it comes to CPU-intensive tasks such as working with large spreadsheets or high-resolution images and video, this budget laptop will give you the edge over others in its price range.

HP 250 G4

Unfortunately the processor can’t compensate for the slow 5400rpm hard drive in there. HP has chosen a 1TB model, which provides plenty of room for storage. However, it’s a spinning hard disk, rather than an SSD, and anything from boot to application loading times suffer as a result.

Early verdict

A low-resolution display is the all that mars an otherwise impressive package here. It’s rare that you’ll get an Intel Core-series processor lurking in a laptop like the HP 250 G4, and that alone means that businesses should at least consider it for workers who undertake certain tasks. It’s not the prettiest or lightest 15-inch laptop out there, and users will need to hook it up to an external display for working with multiple applications or browser windows side-by-side.

Source: Tech Radar

Lego 'Rogue One' sets give hints for the upcoming Star Wars film – CNET

The new sets include characters like K-2SO droid and Jyn Erso, as well as an Imperial Assault Hovertank, AT-ST Walker and more.
Source: CNet